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Photo: Sara Krulwich

OFF-BROADWAY REVIEW: Latin History for Morons

March 27, 2017: Resist the urges to call the fire department that you will probably experience during John Leguizamo’s Latin History for Morons, which opened on Monday night at the Public Theater. That’s chalk dust, not smoke, rising from its star’s feverish frame. Mr. Leguizamo, you see, has appointed himself our instructor in a class intended to rectify the omissions in standard school texts of his people’s — or peoples’ — contributions to American history. And this grandstanding (and leaping, sliding and hopping) actor and monologuist has equipped himself with the requisite accessories, including a blackboard and an industriously wielded eraser.

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MOST RECENT REVIEWS

BROADWAY REVIEW: Sweat (2017)

March 26, 2017: The bar that is the principal location for “Sweat,” Lynn Nottage’s bracingly topical portrait of American dreams deferred in working-class Pennsylvania, is a place where friendships go to die. Sure, it looks awfully cozy and welcoming, and you can see why its denizens regard it as a second home.

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OFF-BROADWAY REVIEW: The New Yorkers

March 23, 2017: So this is what Manhattan looked like in the tipsy yesterday of Prohibition, when drinking was an illicit thrill you couldn’t get enough of, and the world was best seen through a martini glass — preferably of cut crystal and filled to the sloshing point with bathtub gin. The view, I must say, is divine.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Miss Saigon

March 23, 2017: Even before the orchestra sighs its first purple notes from the swoony score of “Miss Saigon,” which opened in a time-warped revival on Thursday night, the audience at the Broadway Theater is treated to another noise — less mellifluous, perhaps, but more titillating, at least for the purposes of this show. Listen and thrill, O seekers of sensation, to the “pah-pah-pah” of rotor blades beating the air.

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OFF-BROADWAY REVIEW: How to Transcend a Happy Marriage

March 20, 2017: In 1969, two married couples took off their clothes and jumped into one accommodatingly wide bed. Thus did Paul Mazursky’s satirical film Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice claim a little piece of cinematic immortality, while putting a knowing finger on a middle-class American pulse that throbbed with both lust and anxiety about the sexual revolution that was said to be sweeping the country. Ah, the clumsiness, the tortured soul-searching, the naïveté of those heady, experimental times. People today of course are far more at ease with their bodies and their vast potential for erotic self-expression. Why, just look at Paul and George and Michael and Jane, the uneasily swinging spouses of Sarah Ruhl’s How to Transcend a Happy Marriage, which opened on Monday night at the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater at Lincoln Center.

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OFF-BROADWAY REVIEW: The Terrifying

March 19, 2017: The unseen but very audible creature that runs rampant in The Terrifying — Julia Jarcho’s lively exhumation of the id within the stories we tell to scare ourselves — is said to have many fearsome qualities. There’s its fecal breath, for starters, and its tusks, which “are so rough as they catch on your guts.” But the description that leeches on to the memory after the lights have come up at the Abrons Arts Center, where this maiden production from Ms. Jarcho’s newly formed Minor Theater opened on Sunday night, is that of what it (or It) does to your mind. Once It has had its way with you, “your thoughts are just little wet brains in its mouth.”

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