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Photo: Shirin Tinati

OFF-BROADWAY REVIEW: Van Gogh’s Ear

August 17, 2017:

The blunt title of the exquisite “Van Gogh’s Ear,” now at the Pershing Square Signature Center, does not refer to art history’s most notorious act of self-mutilation. Or not only to that.

Yes, there is a sequence in this animated tone poem from Ensemble for the Romantic Century that shows Vincent van Gogh shyly proffering what would appear to his severed ear, in a bloody bundle, to a young woman. But the titular ear of this singular show, written by Eve Wolf and directed by Donald T. Sanders, is much more a matter of what and how van Gogh heard.

That would appear to be not so different from what and how van Gogh saw. It is “the painter’s eye” that we usually speak of. But this production makes an appealing case for the interconnectedness of the senses.

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OFF-BROADWAY REVIEW: Really Rosie

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OFF-BROADWAY REVIEW: A Parallelogram

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OFF-BROADWAY REVIEW: A Midsummer’s Night Dream–The Public Theater

July 31, 2017: Try as I might, I could not discern in the Public Theater’s Central Park production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” a single reference to Donald J. Trump. What a relief! Not that it would have been impossible to interpolate the president into the proceedings, as the Public’s “Julius Caesar” notably did earlier this summer; the play’s capaciousness makes nothing unlikely. If you wanted, you could discover auguries of almost any contemporary flash point in the great comedy: global warming, drug abuse, male privilege, transracial adoption.

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