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BROADWAY REVIEW: Anastasia

The amnesiac title character of “Anastasia,” who may or may not be the long-lost daughter of the last Russian czar, isn’t alone in suffering a serious identity crisis. The postcard-scenic show that bears her name, which opened on Monday night at the Broadhurst Theater, has its own troubling case of multiple personality disorder.

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OFF-BROADWAY REVIEW: The Antipodes

April 23, 2017: Just exactly how many kinds of stories are there, anyway? The tallies vary in “The Antipodes,” Annie Baker’s in-all-ways fabulous new play about professional fabulators in pursuit of the ultimate yarn. One character in this endlessly fascinating work, which opened on Sunday in a Signature Theater production, puts the number of variations at 10. Another insists it’s six. And still another has come up with 36 versions, though when he itemizes them, he only reaches 19. Whatever the quantity, it’s hard to imagine a work that touches on as many of those possibilities as “The Antipodes,” or makes as strong a case for the pervasiveness of storytelling in all aspects of our existence. What’s more, unlike her perpetually thwarted characters, who chase their ideas with the exasperation of dogs running after their tails, Ms. Baker delivers a complete and confident narrative. Now “complete” may not be the term you’d apply to a play as steeped in ambiguities as this one. “The Antipodes” portrays a never-ending brainstorming session for unspecified purposes in an unspecified place.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Don’t expect a sugar rush from “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” the new musical that opened at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater on Sunday. This latest adaptation of Roald Dahl’s winningly sinister children’s story from 1964 is — thank heaven — no sweeter than the two film adaptations it inspired, starring Gene Wilder (1971) and Johnny Depp (2005).

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Hello, Dolly!

The pinnacle of fine dining in New York these days can’t be found in a Michelin-starred restaurant, though it will probably cost you just as much. No, you’ll have to get yourself and your wide-open wallet to the Shubert Theater, where the savory spectacle of Bette Midler eating turns out to be the culinary event of the year.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: The Little Foxes

Regina Giddens is a flower of Southern womanhood. That flower is a Venus flytrap. In “The Little Foxes,” Manhattan Theater Club’s nimble, exhilarating revival of Lillian Hellman’s 1939 drama, Regina coerces, deceives, manipulates and maybe even murders. How graceful she is, how charming. And how carnivorous.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Indecent

The road to Broadway was paved with compromise for Sholem Asch’s “God of Vengeance.” Though this early-20th-century Yiddish play had dazzled Greenwich Village audiences in 1922, the show’s producers worried that it might be too provocative for the less bohemian folk of Midtown; a pivotal love scene between two women was deleted from the script, much to the distress of members of the company.

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