Zero Hour OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • NY TIMES

  • TM

  • HUFFINGTON POST

  • NY POST

  • TIME OUT

Opening Night:
October 2, 2010
Closing:
January 9, 2011

Theater: DR2 Theatre / 103 East 15th Street, New York, NY, 10003

Synopsis: 

Starring Jim Brochu as Zero Mostel, Zero Hour is set at Mostel's West 28th Street painting studio where a naïve reporter attempts to interview the famously volatile actor, prompting an explosion of memory, humor, outrage, and juicy backstage lore. It is July 1977 and the actor is giving his final interview before leaving for the pre-Broadway tryout of The Merchant in Philadelphia. Mostel only played one performance as Shylock before his sudden death at the age of 62.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Zero Hour

    That Bellow, That Beard: An Actor’s Life and Hair

    Jason Zinoman

    November 30, 2009: In a biographical solo play about a celebrity, you can usually count on a few things. The conceit designed to get the famous person to narrate a highlights reel of a lifetime is going to be strained. The performance will be theatrical. And at some point the actor will pause dramatically, holding back something that the author has no intention of keeping hidden.

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  • THEATERMANIA REVIEW OF Zero Hour

    Zero

    David Finkle

    November 23, 2009: In the entertaining Zero Hour, now at St. Clement's Church, writer-performer Jim Brochu impersonates girthful, mirthful actor Zero Mostel so accurately that his performance is tantamount to a reincarnation. From head to toe, he's got it right; he has Mostel's ludicrous yet somehow distinguished pushed-forward hair-do; he moves with Mostel's light-footedness; he has the facial expressions that include eyebrows traveling far up the forehead; and he has those famed busy-busy hands and booming voice.

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  • THE HUFFINGTON POST REVIEW OF Zero Hour

    Jim Brochu Recreates a Funny, Volatile Zero Mostel

    Jennifer Farrar

    November 24, 2009: Comedian and actor Zero Mostel was a very funny and at times very angry man, known for his loyal friendship and volatile personality.

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  • NY POST REVIEW OF Zero Hour

    'Zero'-ing In on Legend of Stage & Screen

    Frank Scheck

    December 2, 2009: The rumors of Zero Mostel's death have apparently been greatly exaggerated. At least, that's what you'll conclude after seeing "Zero Hour," the new one-person show about the bigger-than-life legend, who left us in 1977.

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  • TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW OF Zero Hour

    Zero Hour

    Time Out New York

    November 24, 2009: Zero Mostel, who died in 1977, has resisted the fade to nothingness through various recordings of his work: several films (most notably The Producers) and the original-cast albums of his Broadway triumphs (Fiddler on the Roof and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum). By all accounts, however, Mostel blazed most brightly in live performance. So we owe Jim Brochu a debt of gratitude for Zero Hour, an extraordinary act of reincarnation that restores the outsize actor to us in all of his daunting dimensions.

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