Three Days to See OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Sara Krulwich
  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    July 12, 2015
    Closing:
    August 16, 2015

    Theater: Theatre 79 / 79 East 4th Street, New York, NY 10003

    Synopsis: 

    What remains when the senses fail? Who do you become? Prepare to question everything you know about your experience of the world as a brilliant and just-a-tad-unhinged company of actors shatter the stereotypes of one of the greatest thinkers of the 20th Century. The world premiere of Three Days To See creates a vivid, deeply moving, and strangely hilarious portrait of Helen Keller revealing a startling hidden story of luminous intelligence and extraordinary accomplishment. These electric performers will joyfully demolish and reconstruct everything you thought you knew about this utterly unique American icon and introduce you to Keller's revelatory and singular take on culture, feminism, romance and politics. Your perception of this trailblazer will never be the same.

    BUY TICKETS BUY GROUP TICKETS
  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Three Days to See

    Helen Keller’s Words and Seven Actors in ‘Three Days to See’

    Alexis Soloski

    July 27, 2015: Helen Keller had a brief stage career. This might sound like a joke. It isn’t. In the 1920s, she toured the vaudeville circuit with Annie Sullivan, swanning around in sequined dresses while demonstrating her accomplishments and cracking jokes about drink and politics. A New York Times review effused, “Helen Keller has conquered again.” Many decades after that triumph, Keller is onstage again in the Transport Group’s often moving, sometimes sudsy, sometimes dull “Three Days to See,” a play drawn from Keller’s writing and speeches. The director Jack Cummings III has culled nearly two hours of observations and anecdotes and assigned them to a cast of seven animated actors. These performers — a grab bag of age, race, gender and height — all play Keller, occasionally wearing a pinafore. While there is much discussion of Sullivan’s teaching methods, there’s not a lot in “Three Days to See” that will make you think of “The Miracle Worker.” Sure, there are occasional bouts of earnestness, but much of the material is playful and even peppy, with passages set to an unimaginative assortment of show tune instrumentals and classical jingles.

    READ THE REVIEW

BEST REVIEWED SHOWS

    JerseyBoys    Phantom    Motown    Wicked
DOWNLOAD THE APP