The Flick OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Sara Krulwich
  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    May 19, 2015
    Closing:
    August 30, 2015

    Theater: Barrow Street Theatre / 27 Barrow Street, New York, NY, 10014

    Synopsis: 

    In a run-down movie theater in central Massachusetts, three underpaid employees mop the floors and attend to one of the last 35-millimeter film projectors in the state. Their tiny battles and not-so-tiny heartbreaks play out in the empty aisles, becoming more gripping than the lackluster, second-run movies on screen. With keen insight and a finely-tuned comic eye, "The Flick" is a hilarious and heart-rending cry for authenticity in a fast-changing world.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF The Flick

    In ‘The Flick,’ Contemplating a Life of Stale Popcorn

    Charles Isherwood

    May 18, 2015: “People always freak out when like, you know, when like art forms move forward,” says Sam, one of the lonely souls working in a run-down Massachusetts movie theater in the wondrous Annie Baker play “The Flick.” That line made me laugh out loud, although it’s hardly a punch line — and the movie whose radicalism is being celebrated happens to be, um, “Avatar.” No, the words resonate because Ms. Baker’s play is a notable case in point: a work of art so strange and fresh that it definitely freaks people out. When this moving drama about the beauty and sadness in small lives was first staged at Playwrights Horizons in 2013, it won ardent admirers (most critics included, and certainly this one) but also irritated some viewers, who found its surface lack of theatrics and quietly observational pacing a trial. Walkouts at intermission — or indeed midact — were not rare. But go figure: “The Flick” went on to win the Pulitzer Prize last year, in a rare case of the award’s going to a play that truly nudges the art form in new directions; more regularly it’s the traditional and easily digestible works that win that trophy. On the strength of such recognition, and the many who responded enthusiastically to the play, it has now been remounted at the Barrow Street Theater, where it opened on Monday night with the sublime original cast intact, once again under the deep-focus direction of Sam Gold.

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