Storm Still OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • NY TIMES

  • TIME OUT

  • BACKSTAGE

  • NY THEATRE

  • TM

Opening Night:
February 19, 2011
Closing:
March 6, 2011

Theater: P.S. 122 / 150 1st Avenue (@ Corner of 9th Street), New York, NY, 10009

Synopsis: 

Outside an abandoned school, war rages. Inside, three kids perform King Lear, unsupervised, for years. Further inside, the mad King debates the purpose of theatre with his Fool, a licensed therapist.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Storm Still

    ‘King Lear’ Inspires a Riff on the Endurance of Time

    Ken Jaworowski

    February 27, 2011: There comes a point in “Storm Still” when even the most patient theatergoer will stop forgiving its faults. That point occurs when a man, naked except for a Tarzan-like loincloth, is spanked repeatedly by another character, then bent over a chair and sodomized with a walking stick — a stick that is thrown to the floor and picked up in the mouth of an actor portraying a dog.

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  • TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW OF Storm Still

    Storm Still at P.S. 122 blusters to little effect

    Helen Shaw

    February 25, 2011: Let me first say that I really like the Nonsense Company, a strange trio of musicians and poets who make experimental music theater out of diffident conversation and nearly-hidden compositional structures. When they showed up in town with The Conversation Storm/The Great Hymn of Thanksgiving, the seemingly modest show rocked those who saw it; we saw two art forms joining at a microcellular level, with music and text intermixing even more intimately than they do in opera. But in Storm Still—their dispiriting and lugubrious po-mo construction with occasional moments of grace—the trio hits an extremely sour chord. Why?

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  • BACKSTAGE REVIEW OF Storm Still

    Storm Still

    A.J. Mell

    February 28, 2011: The three members of the Nonsense Company try awfully hard to imbue this multilayered riff on Act 3, Scene 6 of "King Lear" with a sense of anarchic fun. Unfortunately, the play's freewheeling form is something of a Trojan horse, hiding a core of donnish theater-geek in-jokes; it's as if the Firesign Theatre (whom I never understood either) had weighed down one of its druggy surrealist sketches with ponderous references to the Oresteia and Aristotle's theory of catharsis. It's erudite, intelligently acted, highly theatrical, and it made me want to scream.

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  • NY THEATRE REVIEW OF Storm Still

    Storm Still

    Martin Denton

    February 20, 2011: The Nonsense Company's Storm Still is described in the press materials as "an extended meditation on Act Three, Scene Six of King Lear."

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  • THEATERMANIA REVIEW OF Storm Still

    Storm Still

    Chris Kompanek

    February 24, 2011: Storm Still, the latest creation of Nonsense Company writer/performers Rick Burkhardt, Andy Gricevich, and Ryan Higgins now at P.S. 122, strings together a series of seemingly disconnected scenes riffing on and deconstructing King Lear at an alarmingly fast and free-associative pace. And while the two-hour piece could be edited, the final result is an impressive exploration of one of Shakespeare's most misunderstood kings.

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