Million Dollar Quartet OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • NY TIMES

  • NY 1

  • WSJ

  • HR

  • NY MAG

Opening Night:
July 28, 2011
Closing:
June 24, 2012

Theater: New World Stages / 340 West 50th Street, New York, NY, 10019

Synopsis: 

Inspired by the true story, Million Dollar Quartet features a treasure trove of the greatest rock and roll, gospel, R&B and country hits from these musicians, including such iconic songs as "Blue Suede Shoes," "Fever," "Sixteen Tons," "Who Do You Love?," "Great Balls of Fire," "Riders in the Sky," "I Walk the Line," "Folsom Prison Blues," and "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On." Million Dollar Quartet captures the infectious spirit, freewheeling excitement and thrilling sounds of a singular moment when four of the music industry's most extraordinary talents, all in their creative prime, came together for one of the most memorable nights in music history.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Million Dollar Quartet

    Over at Sun Records, Whole Lotta Rock History Goin’ On

    Charles Isherwood

    April 12, 2010: Those teeming hordes of the middle-aged wandering without purpose in the theater district, having seen “Jersey Boys” for the 27th time and been forbidden a 28th by their addiction therapists, can come to rest at last. The new destination: the Nederlander Theater, where “Million Dollar Quartet,” a buoyant new jukebox musical about a hallowed day in the history of rock ’n’ roll, rollicked open on Sunday night.

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  • NY1 REVIEW OF Million Dollar Quartet

    NY1 Theater Review: "Million Dollar Quartet"

    Roma Torre

    April 15, 2010: The problem with jukebox musicals is that the songs and the story attempting to tie them together often fall flat, feeling forced and downright dissonant. The good ones make for sweet harmony, and that is most certainly the case with the resounding "Million Dollar Quartet."

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  • WALL STREET JOURNAL REVIEW OF Million Dollar Quartet

    That's Good Rockin' Tonight

    Mr. Teachout

    April 16, 2012: Good clean rockabilly fun has come to Broadway in the form of "Million Dollar Quartet," an unpretentious, engagingly energetic staged concert with just enough story to qualify it as a jukebox musical. The subject is the celebrated evening in 1956 when Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley got together at Sam Phillips's recording studio in Memphis, Tenn., for an informal pre-Christmas jam session. These pop-music giants are respectively portrayed by Lance Guest, Levi Kreis, Robert Britton Lyons and Eddie Clendening, four accomplished musicians who evoke their legendary models without stooping to literal imitation. Put them together and you get a hell of a band.

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  • HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW OF Million Dollar Quartet

    Good rockin' tonight at "Million Dollar Quartet"

    Frank Scheck

    April 12, 2010: One day in December 1956, four future musical legends -- Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins -- happened to gather together for an impromptu jam session at the Memphis studio of Sun Records.

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  • NEW YORK MAGAZINE REVIEW OF Million Dollar Quartet

    Sounds Like a Million Bucks

    Stephanie Zacharek

    April 11, 2010: Fans of fifties rock and roll tend to love it not just reasonably but feverishly, and with good reason: To listen to the recordings made by Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and Carl Perkins at Sam Phillips’s Sun Records is to hear the future being born, heralded by jangly guitars, the thump-thump of a stand-up bass, and a piano with the jittery nerves of a brand-new dad. Million Dollar Quartet, a show poised delicately at the halfway point between a musical and a revue, distills that revolutionary spirit and splashes it out as a dazzling, raucous spectacle. Written by music historian Colin Escott and Floyd Mutrux (the latter of whom made the marvelous, and rarely seen, 1978 film American Hot Wax, loosely based on the story of the disgraced disc jockey Alan Freed), and directed by Eric Schaeffer, it’s an imagined account of the real-life day—December 4, 1956—on which Perkins, Cash, Lewis, and Elvis all happened to gather at Sun Records for an impromptu session.

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