Mercury Fur OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Michelle V. Agins
  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    August 19, 2015
    Closing:
    September 27, 2015

    Theater: Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre at The Pershing Square Signature Center / 480 West 42nd Street, New York, NY, 10019

    Synopsis: 

    In a society ravaged by warring gangs and a hallucinogenic-drug epidemic, Elliot and Darren, under the sway of the ruthless Spinx, throw parties for rich clients in abandoned apartment buildings - parties that help guests act out their darkest, most sinister fantasies. As the teenage brothers prepare for the latest festivities, some unexpected guests threaten the balance of the world they have created in the midst of this dystopian nightmare. Hailed as a “savage and utterly gripping drama” by Ben Brantley, Philip Ridley’s Mercury Fur is a terrifying, yet tender, look at just how far people will go to protect those they love the most.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Mercury Fur

    In Philip Ridley’s ‘Mercury Fur,’ It’s the World’s End, and the Party’s Here

    Ben Brantley

    August 19, 2015: Even those who binge on apocalyptic splatter movies are going to be rattled by “Mercury Fur,” Philip Ridley’s pitch-dark portrait of the day after tomorrow in the big city. Granted, this blistering production from the New Group, which opened on Wednesday night at the Pershing Square Signature Center, doesn’t have the big-screen special effects associated with cinematic gore fests about the end of the world. So, no, there are no exploding heads or melting cars, no meteoric balls of fire or giant mutants devouring human beings like candy. Mr. Ridley is working on the relatively small canvas of a derelict living room in an abandoned apartment. Yet he still manages to provide searing panoramic views of a blasted landscape overrun by monsters. I mean monsters like you and me — vulnerable human beings whom you might, under other circumstances, want to take into your arms and cuddle protectively. “Mercury Fur” has been unsettling people since it was first staged in Britain in 2005 (with a young Ben Whishaw in the cast), when it divided critics and theatergoers with a vehemence that brought to mind the appalled reception to “Blasted,” Sarah Kane’s 1995 account of a British city under siege. In The Telegraph, Charles Spencer described “Mercury Fur” as the work of a writer “turned on by his own sick fantasies,” and Mr. Ridley’s publisher, Faber & Faber, declined to publish the text.

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