Ludic Proxy OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Carol Rosegg
  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    April 1, 2015
    Closing:
    May 2, 2015

    Theater: Walkerspace / 46 Walker Street, New York, NY, 10013

    Synopsis: 

    PlayCo commissioned Aya for a new original play after producing her brilliant translation of Toshiki Okada’s play ENJOY in 2010. She has devised a beautiful, haunting and magical piece that pulls you into uncharted territory where memory, fantasy and virtual reality swirl together. Three intertwining stories, from the past, present and future, tap into our deepest impressions of living in tumultuous times as nature and technology evolve out of our control, and explore the eternal drive for human connection.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Ludic Proxy

    In ‘Ludic Proxy,’ a Blur of Actual and Virtual Reality

    Alexis Soloski

    April 12, 2015: Nina, a Russian woman now living with her sister in America, finds herself back in her childhood apartment. She sees her mailbox, her mother’s kitchenware, her father’s vodka bottles, “all the books we left behind.” But Nina isn’t really home; she’s watching her nephew play a version of the video game Call of Duty, set in Pripyat, the Ukrainian town she was forced to evacuate after the Chernobyl disaster. “Ludic Proxy,” an ambitious and intermittently successful drama written and directed by Aya Ogawa for the Play Company, takes its title from a particularly contemporary phenomenon: the feeling that we know a place in reality because we have encountered it virtually. (A few years ago, my husband was driving on a Miami causeway for the first time when he realized he knew the route already — from Grand Theft Auto.) The play shows how the simulated can adjoin, infuse or ultimately replace the actual. In the first and strongest section, Nina (Jackie Katzman) slips between her rose-colored Russian girlhood, as she rehearses the part of Nina in Chekhov’s “The Seagull,” and the starker present-day world of Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. As her nephew and his friend play Call of Duty, actors create the game’s visuals by using tiny cameras to film a dollhouse (beautifully conceived by the lighting and video designer Jeanette Oi-Suk Yew).

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