How I Learned To Drive OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • NY TIMES

  • AP

  • AMNY

  • NY POST

  • VARIETY

  • TALKIN' BWAY

  • BACKSTAGE

Opening Night:
February 13, 2012
Closing:
March 11, 2012

Theater: Second Stage Theatre / 305 West 43rd Street, New York, NY, 10036

Synopsis: 

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, How I Learned to Drive explores the complex relationship between Li'l Bit (Elizabeth Reaser) and her Uncle Peck (Norbert Leo Butz), as a series of driving lessons progresses from innocence to something much darker. Told with surprising wit, Paula Vogel's acclaimed play is returning to New York City for the first time since its world premiere 15 years ago.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF How I Learned To Drive

    Going Along for the Ride With Uncle

    Ben Brantley

    February 13, 2012: The guy finally utters those three little words that the girl has needed to hear. “I love you,” he says. And her face lights up like candles on a birthday cake.

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  • ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW OF How I Learned To Drive

    Revival of 'How I Learned to Drive' idles too much

    Mary Kennedy

    February 13, 2012: Norbert Leo Butz, you might say, has switched gears completely, going from a goofy, glitzy musical in which he plays an FBI agent to a harrowing play where he's definitely on the other side of the law.

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  • AM NEW YORK REVIEW OF How I Learned To Drive

    Theater Review: 'How I Learned to Drive' -- 3 stars

    Matt Windman

    February 13, 2012: More than a decade after winning the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, Paula Vogel's "How I Learned to Drive" remains a dark and quirky romantic comedy involving incest and child molestation - one that is just as unsettling as it is entertaining.

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  • NY POST REVIEW OF How I Learned To Drive

    Lacking ‘Drive’

    Frank Scheck

    February 14, 2012: Norbert Leo Butz has always brought a certain strangeness to his roles, whether a buffoonish con artist in “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” or an obsessive FBI agent in “Catch Me If You Can.” But as the pedophile Uncle Peck in “How I Learned To Drive,” he’s all too human, inducing feelings of revulsion and sympathy all at once.

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  • VARIETY REVIEW OF How I Learned To Drive

    How I Learned to Drive

    Marilyn Stasio

    February 13, 2012: "How I Learned to Drive," which won Paula Vogel the Pulitzer Prize in 1998 (and hasn't been seen in New York since), is one of those plays you don't forget in a hurry. Show not only holds up in this Second Stage revival, it still packs an emotional wallop. Playing outside their comfort zones, Elizabeth Reaser ("Twilight," "Grey's Anatomy") and Norbert Leo Butz (two-time Tony winner for "Catch Me If You Can" and "Dirty Rotten Scoundrels") sensitively establish the intense, if unhealthy rapport between a sympathetic pedophile and the niece who learns more than she needs to know from him.

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  • TALKIN' BROADWAY REVIEW OF How I Learned To Drive

    How I Learned to Drive

    Matthew Murray

    February 13, 2012: "Sometimes to tell a secret, you first have to teach a lesson." Those are indeed prophetic words, as spoken by Elizabeth Reaser at the beginning of Kate Whoriskey's new production of Paula Vogel's How I Learned to Drive at Second Stage. Playing Li'l Bit, the conflicted young woman whose ready-to-spill secret is as big as her ample chest, Reaser is properly setting you up for an evening that's more educational than emotionally enlightening, and more intellectually stimulating than psychologically devastating. This is not to suggest, however, that all time spent in a classroom — or even a theater doing double duty as one — is necessarily worthless.

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  • BACKSTAGE REVIEW OF How I Learned To Drive

    NY Review: 'How I Learned to Drive'

    Erik Haagensen

    February 13, 2012: Ah, the ineffable alchemy of theater. Who can say why some brews bubble while others go distressingly flat? (As Alan Jay Lerner once said when asked to account for the startling success of "My Fair Lady," "Maybe it was the chandeliers.") Second Stage seems to have the ingredients in place: a top director, a talented cast, and a Pulitzer Prize–winning script. Nevertheless, this new production of Paula Vogel's 1997 drama "How I Learned to Drive" never slips satisfyingly into gear.

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