Hotel Savoy OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • NY TIMES

  • NY MAG

  • CURTAIN UP

  • NY POST

  • NY THEATRE

Opening Night:
September 30, 2010
Closing:
October 31, 2010

Theater: Goethe-Institut New York / 1014 5th Ave, New York, NY, 10028

Synopsis: 

Hotel Savoy is experienced singly - that is to say, by an audience of one. Visitors enter one-by-one and begin their personal journey through the hotel. Inside they will encounter five real people: the elevator operator, the young maid, the hotel barber, the concierge, and the bartender. These inhabitants, each with their own anecdotes and relationship to the building, act as intermediaries and gatekeepers. They gently guide each audience member into remote corners of the space; and at the same time, they create a customized story and experience for each audience member.

To be sure, this is not a performance predicated on traditional audience participation - there is no pressure for visitors to perform, there is no stage to be thrust upon - rather, audience members can just relax and be themselves as they delight in exploring this peculiar hotel and engaging with the slightly unconventional staff. Each audience member becomes a guest in the Hotel Savoy and in so doing, becomes the main character in an amazing reality that reveals itself exclusively to them.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Hotel Savoy

    The Porter Will Kindly Show You to Your Doom

    Charles Isherwood

    October 6, 2010: Arriving just in time for haunted house season is “Hotel Savoy,” a site-specific theater piece by Dominic Huber presented by P.S. 122 in association with the Goethe-Institut on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, smack opposite the Metropolitan Museum. Inspired by the Austrian writer Joseph Roth’s 1924 novel of the same name, the work is essentially a solo performance with a few minor supporting characters. The soloist — surprise! — is you.

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  • NEW YORK MAGAZINE REVIEW OF Hotel Savoy

    The Inside-Out Audience Experience at Hotel Savoy

    Scott Brown

    October 1, 2010: Miffed that Kubrick never cast you in anything? Looking forward to next year at Marienbad? Tired of the Living, with their relatively straightforward answers to basic questions? Check in to Hotel Savoy, a brief, unsettling theatrical phantasm custom-designed for an audience of You. Designed by theater architect Dominic Huber, Savoy is, at heart, an old-fashioned haunted house, reimagined by punctilious German aesthetes and aimed at people who normally prefer art installations to Jaycees in rubber masks.

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  • CURTAIN UP REVIEW OF Hotel Savoy

    Hotel Savoy

    Elizabeth Ahlfors

    October 7, 2010: Expect the unexpected when you check into the Hotel Savoy at Goethe-Institut New York. This is a singular experience. As a guest, you become part of the cast and at the same time, you are the one-person audience. You don't have scripted lines to say, but when people speak to you, of course, you have to answer. You don't know where to go or who you're going to see, but you travel through a once lavish townhouse that boasts an elaborate circular staircase and richly carved paneling next to narrow halls and rooms in desperate disrepair.

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  • NEW YORK POST REVIEW OF Hotel Savoy

    A Halloween 'haunt' spot

    Frank Scheck

    October 5, 2010: There's hardly a short age of Halloween attractions this time of year, but few are as haunting as "Hotel Savoy" -- a theater piece that has you wander alone for an hour through an old building, encountering chambermaids and others in often surreal settings. The piece, which PS 122 is presenting in an old building opposite the Met Museum, is based on a 1924 novel about a former prisoner of war who comes to stay at a hotel that represents a crumbling society.

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  • NY THEATRE REVIEW OF Hotel Savoy

    Hotel Savoy

    Gyda Arber

    October 1, 2010: I primarily think of the theatre as a social event, something experienced with others, other audience members, often friends, a collective group experience. Which is what makes Dominic Huber's Hotel Savoy so odd—throughout your time in the piece, you encounter a lot of characters in the hotel, but only briefly do you pass by other audience members, ephemerally, as if they're not even there.

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