Ghosts OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Julieta Cervantes
  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    April 5, 2015
    Closing:
    May 3, 2015

    Theater: BAM Harvey Theater / 651 Fulton Street, New York, NY,

    Synopsis: 

    Uncouth family relations. Malicious infections. Upended Victorian mores. Considered shockingly indecent when it premiered in 1882, Ghosts is given chilling new life in this production, which originated at the Almeida Theatre and was transferred to the West End by Sonia Friedman Productions. Lesley Manville (Grief, National Theatre; Mike Leigh films, including Another Year and Topsy-Turvy) gives an Olivier Award-winning performance leading the cast in director Richard Eyre’s (The Crucible, Broadway; The Invention of Love, National Theatre; Carmen and Le Nozze di Figaro, Metropolitan Opera) multi-award-winning adaptation of Ibsen’s masterpiece. Helene Alving has spent her life suspended in an emotional void after the death of her cruel but outwardly charming husband. She is determined to escape the ghosts of her past by telling her son, Oswald, the truth about his father. But on his return from his life as a painter in France, Oswald reveals how he has already inherited the legacy of Alving’s dissolute life.

    BUY TICKETS BUY GROUP TICKETS
  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Ghosts

    In Richard Eyre’s Production of ‘Ghosts,’ the Clean Parts Are the Most Disturbing

    Ben Brantley

    April 12, 2015: So this is what all the fuss was about. Richard Eyre’s full-strength production of Ibsen’s “Ghosts,” which opened over the weekend at the Harvey Theater of the Brooklyn Academy of Music, allows you to feel the bruising force with which this drama assaulted unsuspecting audiences of the late 19th century. “Ghosts,” after all, remains the great historical example of a single play’s power to disturb. Its first productions left theatergoers reeling and revolted, with critics scrambling to outdo one another with expressions of disgust and derision, including The Daily Telegraph’s immortal characterization of the play as “an open drain; a loathsome sore unbandaged; a dirty act done publicly.” Cultural shock tremors tend to subside over the years, allowing later generations to chuckle at how squeamish and priggish their ancestors were. Then along comes a production like this “Ghosts,” adapted and directed by Mr. Eyre and starring a coruscating Lesley Manville, and the laughter dies in our throats. For what comes through so searingly in this version, from the Almeida Theater in London — possibly the best “Ghosts” you’ll ever see — is the Jehovah-like mercilessness of Ibsen’s indictment of a middle class that remains smug in an advanced state of decay. You realize, with a visceral jolt, that what unsettled this work’s early audiences weren’t just the play’s explicit references to unsavory matters like venereal disease.

    READ THE REVIEW

BEST REVIEWED SHOWS

    JerseyBoys    Phantom    Motown    Wicked
DOWNLOAD THE APP