Cymbeline OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Michelle V. Agins
  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    July 23, 2015
    Closing:
    August 23, 2015

    Theater: Delacorte Theatre / Central Park, New York, NY, 10023

    Synopsis: 

    Tony Award winner Daniel Sullivan (King Lear, The Comedy of Errors, Proof) directs the Shakespearean fairy tale Cymbeline, featuring Tony nominee Lily Rabe and Hamish Linklater. In the Shakespearean fairytale Cymbeline, Princess Imogen’s fidelity is put to the royal test when her disapproving father banishes her soul mate. Cross-dressing girls and cross-dressing boys, poisons and swordfights and dastardly villains all take the stage in this enchanting romp about the conquering power of love.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Cymbeline

    ‘Cymbeline’ Unspools Its Many Plot Twists at the Delacorte Theater

    Charles Isherwood

    August 10, 2015: Not one but two gilt prosceniums currently adorn the normally proscenium-free Delacorte Theater in Central Park, where the Public Theater is presenting “Cymbeline,” Shakespeare’s weird and wonder-filled late romance, as its second offering of the free summer season. Piled around the outer proscenium are crates, boxes and odd bits of statuary, vaguely suggesting that we are in a disused theater of some advanced age, filled with odd props. Daniel Sullivan, the reliably fine director whose Shakespeare productions here usually have avoided self-conscious concepts, has almost made a U-turn with this disappointing staging, which stars Lily Rabe as the much-wronged heroine, Imogen, and Hamish Linklater as both Posthumus Leonatus, her good-hearted but duped husband, and the cloddish Cloten, a rather less suitable suitor for her hand — who loses his head, literally. Lily Rabe and Hamish Linklater at the Delacorte Theater, where they will be performing in the Shakespeare in the Park production of “Cymbeline.”Lily Rabe and Hamish Linklater: A Midsummer Night’s CoupleJULY 22, 2015 Period switch-ups aside, Mr. Sullivan’s previous productions for Shakespeare in the Park have generally been marked by simplicity and emotional clarity, presenting the plays as truthful, albeit fanciful or painful, reflections of real human experience. Here, the emphasis is somewhat deflatingly on the artifice in “Cymbeline.”

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