Cry, Trojans! OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Sara Krulwich
  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    March 24, 2015
    Closing:
    April 19, 2015

    Theater: St. Ann's Warehouse / 38 Water Street, New York, NY,

    Synopsis: 

    "Cry, Trojans! (Troilus & Cressida)" began as a co-production with the Royal Shakespeare Company. That original production, TROILUS AND CRESSIDA, was commissioned by the RSC for the World Shakespeare Festival, produced for the London 2012 Olympics Festival. Co-directors for the original production: Elizabeth LeCompte and Mark Ravenhill.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Cry, Trojans!

    ‘Cry, Trojans!’ Is the Wooster Group’s Take on ‘Troilus and Cressida’

    Ben Brantley

    April 7, 2015: There’s smoke rising from the tepee that occupies upstage-center at St. Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn. But as hard as you may look, you won’t find the fire — dramatic, emotional or intellectual — in “Cry, Trojans!,” the befuddled and befuddling work in which the mighty Wooster Group lays siege to Shakespeare’s “Troilus and Cressida.” This being a production of an iconoclastic company that likes to occupy several dimensions at the same time, that smoke is only virtual, a rising wisp on a screen. Such is the classic stuff that the Wooster Group’s mind-bending dreams are made on. And there are plenty of the sort of witty, senses-melding touches here that have become Wooster signatures. Staged by Elizabeth LeCompte, one of the troupe’s founders and its artistic director, this Native American-themed production features artful layering of voices artificial and real, and eye-popping costumes that might have been culled from an epochs-spanning cultural compost heap. There is also exactingly choreographed movement, often synced to replicate scenes from movies on video monitors. But to what purpose? Since its founding in the mid-1970s, the Wooster Group has been performing acts of blessed profanation on sacred texts, including Chekhov’s “Three Sisters,” Eugene O’Neill’s “The Emperor Jones” and Racine’s “Phèdre.” As a rule, the company’s text-scrambling, anachronism-flaunting productions confuse only to clarify, and usually wind up commenting astutely not only on their source materials but also on our changing perspectives in interpreting them.

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