Belfast Blues OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

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  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    September 20, 2014
    Closing:
    October 5, 2014

    Theater: Barrow Street Theatre / 27 Barrow Street, New York, NY, 10014

    Synopsis: 

    Geraldine Hughes's one-woman Belfast Blues is a tapestry of stories told from Hughes’ perspective as a little girl coming of age in the war-torn Belfast of the 1980s. Passionate, riveting, often humorous, these stories bear insightful witness to the many faces of “trying to live a normal life” amidst the violence born of the longstanding grudge between Catholics and Protestants.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Belfast Blues

    A Child of the ‘Troubles’ of Northern Ireland Geraldine Hughes Returns to New York With ‘Belfast Blues’

    Claudia La Rocco

    September 29, 2014: Belfast Blues is full of impressive physical moments, when the flow of Geraldine Hughes’s words is either emphasized or countermanded by the casually coiled force of her body. On Saturday afternoon at the Barrow Street Theater, where the show has returned to New York for a limited engagement, one moment in particular stood out: Ms. Hughes standing very still and straight, embodying a British soldier. Would her trigger finger pull back, firing the gun aimed at the small boy whose provocations had worked just a little too well? Of course, there is no gun, nor a little boy — not onstage, at any rate. Save for a shifting backdrop of evocative images designed by Jonathan Christman and spare lighting (Mr. Christman) and sound (Jonathan Snipes), everything that exists in this 90-minute monologue is brought to life by Ms. Hughes, its author. Carol Kane, who directed, must have quickly seen that her writer-actress didn’t need that much theatrical support. Ms. Hughes has good source material: her childhood in a working-class Catholic household of eight in war-torn Northern Ireland. A boisterous humor hums throughout, but it cannot stave off the stress and fear of such an upbringing; not surprisingly, Ms. Hughes dedicates her performances “to all the children who live in places of conflict.”

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