Bambif*cker/Kaffeehaus OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Whitney G-Bowley
  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    March 5, 2015
    Closing:
    March 21, 2015

    Theater: The Brick / 579 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn NY 11211

    Synopsis: 

    A caffeinated ride through sex, death, deer, and Zionism. Sure, you cried when you watched the animated classic Bambi... but how well do you know the real story? Little Lord uncovers just what lies behind those beloved doe eyes in "Bambif*cker/Kaffeehaus," a madcap examination of early 20th century Vienna and of the forgotten artist behind both the world's most beloved deer, as well as its most scandalous piece of pornography. Copious amounts of coffee, the birth of psychoanalysis, sexualized rabbits, The Sound of Music, and Zionism all come together in Little Lord's makeshift, pop-up Viennese café. Your childhood will thank you.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Bambif*cker/Kaffeehaus

    Bambi______/Kaffeehaus’ Mixes Up an Absurdist Linguistic Orgy

    Claudia la Rocco

    March 9, 2015: “What smells so good?” an audience member wondered as she perused the fantastically unhealthy buffet laid out for Saturday’s matinee performance of Little Lord’s “Bambi______/Kaffeehaus” at the Brick. (The title includes an obscenity.) An actor’s prompt answer — “the Pop-Tarts” — was greeted with a brief silence by the theatergoer, and then, more statement than question, “You’re kidding.” But no, it was true: baking in a toaster oven (this buffet spared no detail), that Pop-Tart made this little theater in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, smell divine. It also gave a hint of the delicious and tacky pleasures soon to come, in a production that plays slice and dice with Austrian and Brooklyn cafe culture, anthropomorphic literature, pornography, Zionism, anti-Semitism, psychoanalysis and some other things. The organizing principle within this cheeky hot mess is Felix Salten, the Viennese-Jewish author of both “Bambi” and, anonymously, “Josephine Mutzenbacher: The Life Story of a Viennese Whore, as Told by Herself.” Spliced together by Laura von Holt and Michael Levinton (also the director), and collaged with myriad other sources, these two texts entwine for an absurdist linguistic orgy in which the lines between sentimentality, sexual euphemism and, yes, political commentary, are constantly being mucked with.

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