Baby Doll OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Richard Termine
  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    September 18, 2015
    Closing:
    October 11, 2015

    Theater: McCarter Theater Center / 91 University Place, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540

    Synopsis: 

    Times are tough in the Mississippi Delta, where cotton is king and the summer heat drives desires of every kind. Tennessee Williams' 1950s film masterpiece, Baby Doll, was condemned in its time for its riveting tale of commercial and erotic vengeance. The American premiere of this theatrical adaptation will ignite the stage with its darkly comic, steamy tale of one delicate girl's awakening. From the author of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Glass Menagerie, and A Streetcar Named Desire, Baby Doll is pure Williams, an enthralling tale of prejudice, sexual politics, and passion.

    BUY TICKETS BUY GROUP TICKETS
  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Baby Doll

    ‘Baby Doll,’ a Child-Woman at the Center of a Moral Sinkhole

    Charles Isherwood

    September 22, 2015: Everyone onstage looks a little clammy at times in the enjoyable if slightly tame new stage adaptation of “Baby Doll” at the McCarter Theater Center here. The once-grand but now visibly crumbling mansion in which much of the action takes place looks as if it would give scant protection from the fierce Mississippi Delta sun. But the tensions that inflame its inhabitants are the primary cause of any excessive perspiration. If you’ve seen the sensation-causing 1956 movie, written by Tennessee Williams and directed by Elia Kazan, you will probably recall that the clammiest character by far is Archie Lee Meighan, played here by Robert Joy with an oily desperation. Archie Lee has been married to a comely young woman, referred to only by the endearment of the title, for some time, but by agreement with the girl’s now-dead father, the marriage can only be consummated on her 20th birthday, now just days away. Unfortunately, Mr. Joy’s Archie Lee, who looks perpetually as if he’s just run a marathon in bare feet, cannot take much anticipatory pleasure in the prospect of getting his wife out of the crib she still sleeps in and into the marriage bed. There may be no marriage bed to sleep in. His cotton-gin business is in ruins after the opening of a rival company, and the couple’s furniture is soon hauled out of the house. This mortification so appalls Baby Doll (Susannah Hoffman) that she threatens to withhold her favors in perpetuity, or at least until all that furniture comes back.

    READ THE REVIEW

BEST REVIEWED SHOWS

    JerseyBoys    Phantom    Motown    Wicked
DOWNLOAD THE APP