A Perfect Future OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • NY TIMES

  • TM

  • NY POST

  • NY PRESS

  • VARIETY

Opening Night:
February 17, 2011
Closing:
March 6, 2011

Theater: Cherry Lane Theatre / 38 Commerce Street, New York, NY, 10014

Synopsis: 

At its core, A Perfect Future explores the question of whether people can be married and truly love each other when their political persuasions are diametrically opposed. Set in 2005, the action takes place in the apartment of two well heeled New Yorkers, Natalie and John, who are hosting a dinner for Elliot, a friend from their days as college radicals. Also invited to the party is Mark, a straight-laced young man from John's risk management firm. Over the course of a raucous evening filled with wine and merriment, their basic belief systems are upended, as the four must come to terms with each other's true politics and behavior.

BUY TICKETS BUY GROUP TICKETS
  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF A Perfect Future

    Racism Comes to Dinner and Everything Is Flambé

    David Rooney

    February 22, 2011: The ways in which politics can shape or shatter relationships and divide generations have informed a number of recent plays, among them Lisa Kron’s “In the Wake” and Amy Herzog’s “After the Revolution.” But in “A Perfect Future,” by David Hay, those considerations are just wallpaper.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • THEATERMANIA REVIEW OF A Perfect Future

    A Perfect Future

    Sandy MacDonald

    February 18, 2011: Drop signifiers such as "Bertolucci" and "Volvo" into the opening salvo, as David Hay does in his new play A Perfect Future, now premiering at the Cherry Lane, and we know we have been placed squarely in the land of the limousine liberal.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • NEW YORK POST REVIEW OF A Perfect Future

    Some pour dramatics

    Frank Scheck

    February 21, 2011: If there's one thing we can learn from "A Perfect Future," it's that politics and heavy drinking don't mix. Nor does it make for particularly interesting theater.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • NEW YORK PRESS REVIEW OF A Perfect Future

    An Unearned Hangover

    Mark Peikert

    February 18, 2011: If, as I have often wished, I were Joan Didion, then I could dismiss A Perfect Future and its shallow, artificial liberal characters with one perfect, devastating sentence. Alas, I am not Joan Didion, and so I require this entire review to truly communicate how atrocious and false David Hay’s new black comedy is.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • VARIETY REVIEW OF A Perfect Future

    A Perfect Future

    Marilyn Stasio

    February 17, 2011: From T.S. Eliot to Tracy Letts, the Dinner Party from Hell has always been a reliable set-up for the kind of brittle, sophisticated dramedy that David Hay thinks he's penned in "A Perfect Future." Scribe does, in fact, follow the classic formula by setting up a dinner party for three old friends who were political radicals in their flaming youth -- and by tossing in one unexpected guest to shake them up. But the situation is so contrived that everything about these insufferably smug characters screams bogus-bogus-bogus and every word out of their mouths sounds phoney-phoney-phoney.

    READ THE REVIEW

BEST REVIEWED SHOWS

    JerseyBoys    Phantom    Motown    Wicked
DOWNLOAD THE APP