A Little Journey OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • NY TIMES

  • Opening Night:
    June 6, 2011
    Closing:
    July 17, 2011

    Theater: Mint Theatre / 311 West 43rd Street, New York, NY, 10036

    Synopsis: 

    A Little Journey by Rachel Crothers, a nominee for the first Pulitzer Prize for Drama, has not been produced anywhere since 1918. Crothers' legacy was largely forgotten until the Mint revived Susan and God in 2006. "A voice that remains fresh," lauded The New York Times, while Terry Teachout wrote in the Wall Street Journal: "It is a major event, a pitch perfect production of a 69-year-old play whose subject matter is so modern in flavor that it could have been written last week."

    Set entirely on a westbound train over the course of a four day trip, A Little Journey tells the story of Julie Rutherford, a proud but broken young woman who believes that things cannot possibly get any worse--until disaster strikes. "A compelling human story of love and sorrow" was how the Washington Post greeted the play, which, in the grand tradition of travelogues, showcases an eccentric and charming array of passengers: there's the auburn-topped lady from New York, excruciatingly funny in her ultra-sophistication and yet human; there are two young college lads, awkward, yet lovable; there's the sweet young girl, traveling with her deaf grandma; the self-centered plutocrat who travels in the drawing room; an unmarried mother; Jim West, the big-hearted Westerner; and Julie Rutherford, the girl who finds real life after having been hedged about and bound by conventions and traditions. Julie's down on her luck, and Jim is a lonely rancher who's survived his own troubled life journey. Jim falls in love, but Julie sinks deeper into despair...until a dangerous detour gives them an unexpected chance at happiness.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF A Little Journey

    Go West, Wide-Eyed Easterners

    David Rooney

    June 10, 2011: The setting of a Pullman sleeping car departing Grand Central in spring 1914, bound for the Pacific Coast, evokes thoughts of adventurous pre-Depression train travel, when crossing the country was as much an endurance test as a glamorous jaunt. It suggests East Coast sophisticates leaving behind their cosmopolitan yet insular world to enter a landscape that opened their horizons in ways both physical and figurative.

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