A Disappearing Number OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • NY TIMES

  • TM

  • NY POST

  • BACKSTAGE

  • BACKSTAGE

  • AFTERELTON

  • TALKIN' BWAY

Opening Night:
July 15, 2010
Closing:
July 18, 2010

Theater: Lincoln Center Theater / 150 West 65th Street, New York, NY,

Synopsis: 

Inspired by the true story of the unusual friendship between two of the 20th century's most remarkable pure mathematicians--Cambridge University don G.H. (Godfrey Harold) Hardy and Srinivasa Ramanujan, a young Brahmin genius--A Disappearing Number interweaves their tale with a fictional contemporary love story between a present-day university lecturer and her American-Asian partner.

Past, present, and future occur simultaneously onstage as A Disappearing Number explores such themes as the beauty of science, our quest for meaning and knowledge, who we are and how we connect to one another--and ultimately, what is permanent and what disappears forever.

BUY TICKETS BUY GROUP TICKETS
  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF A Disappearing Number

    Human (and Mathematical) Equations

    Charles Isherwood

    July 17, 2010: Zeroes, ones, twos and threes glide and slide, shimmy and leap before your eyes in the quietly mesmerizing play “A Disappearing Number,” a production from the British company Complicite that plays through Sunday as part of the Lincoln Center Festival. The familiar little digits we use for all sorts of mundane purposes, like marking time and counting money, slowly begin to acquire talismanic power as they swim across the video screens onstage or blink from a clock in the corner.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • THEATERMANIA REVIEW OF A Disappearing Number

    A Disappearing Number

    David Finkle

    July 16, 2010: To make a longish story short, A Disappearing Number, which is being presented for a short run by the Lincoln Center Festival 2010 and the David H. Koch Theater, is a thrilling, thrilling, thrilling play -- perhaps a surprising statement for a work about mathematics, a subject that can instantly make eyes around the globe glaze over.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • NEW YORK POST REVIEW OF A Disappearing Number

    http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/theater/disappearing_number_1at7CnVyERkOuit9QNBb4I

    Frank Scheck

    July 19, 2010: Shortly into the Complicite theater company's "A Disappearing Number," a professor (Saskia Reeves) delivers a lecture on mathematics. As she scribbles ever more complicated equations, you can practically feel the audience tense.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • BACKSTAGE REVIEW OF A Disappearing Number

    A Disappearing Number

    David Sheward

    July 19, 2010: Math was my worst subject in school, so my heart sank a bit when "A Disappearing Number" began with an earnest lecturer striding onto the stage of the David H. Koch Theatre and explaining numerical sequences. But when another actor entered and said, "I'll bet you thought the whole show would be like this," the audience laughed, and we knew we were in safe hands. This complex, bizarre, theatrical meditation on how numbers influence our lives flows like a combination sci-fi thriller and scholarly treatise. Conceived and directed by Simon McBurney and devised with members of his company, Complicite, it's presented here for an appallingly short run as part of the Lincoln Center Festival after winning the Evening Standard and Olivier awards for best play in London.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • BACKSTAGE REVIEW OF A Disappearing Number

    A Disappearing Number

    David Sheward

    July 19, 2010: Math was my worst subject in school, so my heart sank a bit when "A Disappearing Number" began with an earnest lecturer striding onto the stage of the David H. Koch Theatre and explaining numerical sequences. But when another actor entered and said, "I'll bet you thought the whole show would be like this," the audience laughed, and we knew we were in safe hands. This complex, bizarre, theatrical meditation on how numbers influence our lives flows like a combination sci-fi thriller and scholarly treatise. Conceived and directed by Simon McBurney and devised with members of his company, Complicite, it's presented here for an appallingly short run as part of the Lincoln Center Festival after winning the Evening Standard and Olivier awards for best play in London.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • AFTERELTON REVIEW OF A Disappearing Number

    Secrets of the Trade

    Sam Thielman

    August 10, 2010: Life is rough: In Jonathan Tolins' "Secrets of the Trade," closeted New York teenager Andy Lipman has only a celebrity mentor, a pair of wonderfully supportive parents, and an Ivy League education to see him through his coming-out experience. How will Andy survive? Pretty easily, it turns out, although it's a little harder to understand how this production survives its extraordinarily low stakes and thematic shallowness. Somehow, though, between uniformly excellent perfs and just enough charm to squeak by, survive it does.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • TALKIN' BROADWAY REVIEW OF A Disappearing Number

    Bottom Of The World

    Matthew Murray

    September 14, 2010: In the theatre, darkness is frequently more illuminating than light. When you have to work to drag even the tiniest bit of hope or faith from characters, how can you not feel you've accomplished more than if their happier sides are on display from minute one onstage? That Lucy Thurber's play Bottom of the World, which the Atlantic Theater Company just opened at its Stage 2 space, succeeds at all given how hard you don't have to work is a happy circumstance, if one that won't inspire much satisfied celebration.

    READ THE REVIEW

BEST REVIEWED SHOWS

    JerseyBoys    Phantom    Motown    Wicked
DOWNLOAD THE APP