The Snow Geese BROADWAY REVIEWS

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  • NY TIMES

  • BROADWAY WORLD

  • HR

  • AMNY

  • NEWSDAY

Opening Night:
October 24, 2013
Closing:
December 15, 2013

Theater: Samuel J. Friedman / 261 West 47th Street, New York, NY,

Synopsis: 

With World War I raging abroad, newly widowed Elizabeth Gaesling gathers her family for their annual shooting party to mark the opening of hunting season in rural, upstate New York. But Elizabeth is forced to confront a new reality as her carefree eldest son comes to terms with his impending deployment overseas and her younger son discovers that the father they all revered left them deeply in debt. Together, the family must let go of the life they’ve always known.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF The Snow Geese

    A Matriarch’s Cold Realities Pile Up

    Ben Brantley

    October 24, 2013: As a service to readers and copy editors, I feel the need to point out that “The Snow Geese” and “The Snow Goose” are not the same thing. “The Snow Geese” (plural), a new play by Sharr White that opened on Thursday night at the Samuel J. Friedman Theater, is a sentimental tale set during World War I. “The Snow Goose” (singular), a novella from the early 1940s by Paul Gallico, is a sentimental tale set during World War II.

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  • BROADWAY WORLD REVIEW OF The Snow Geese

    THE SNOW GEESE Sees America Through Chekhovian Eyes

    Michael Dale

    October 24, 2013: Sharr White's The Snow Geese certainly contains the standard ingredients required for a contemporary Chekhovian drama. There's the stately old family home that must soon be vacated, an assemblage of characters that could have been plucked from the pages of Uncle Vanya, The Seagull and The Cherry Orchard (including a delusional matriarch, a sensitive doctor, a demonstratively devout woman and a servant who sees the foolishness in them all), a symbolic title referring to nature and a theme stressing necessity to adapt to unavoidable change.

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  • HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW OF The Snow Geese

    Mary-Louise Parker stars as a recently widowed upstate New York woman in 1917, determined not to face her family's financial reality in Sharr White's drama.

    David Rooney

    October 24, 2013: NEW YORK – At a glance, the title of The Snow Geese might seem to evoke either The Wild Duck or The Seagull, but playwright Sharr White’s chosen model is Chekhov all the way. In case the wintry birch trees framing the stage weren’t clear enough, one lonely voice of pragmatism that might have stepped directly out of The Cherry Orchard says with blunt significance early on, “God knows what would happen if we ever stopped talking and actually did something around here.” But homage is a tricky thing, in this case making for a tedious play that’s stubbornly unaffecting, its pathos hollow and manufactured.

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  • AM NEW YORK REVIEW OF The Snow Geese

    Theater review: 'The Show Geese' -- 2.5 stars

    Matt Windman

    October 24, 2013: It's become an all-too- familiar scenario on stage and in film: The comfortably affluent housewife, oblivious to the fact that her family's money has been drained away due to poor oversight and a total lack of restraint, awakens one day to the sobering reality that the party is over and she must make do with less.

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  • NEWSDAY REVIEW OF The Snow Geese

    'The Snow Geese' review: Family muddle

    Linda Winer

    October 24, 2013: Sharr White writes so knowingly about complicated women that one might be forgiven for assuming, as I once did, that he is a woman playwright.

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