A Tale Of Two Cities BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • taleoftwo
  • NY TIMES

  • NEWSDAY

  • AMNY

  • BROADWAY SPACE.COM

  • USA TODAY

Opening Night:
September 18, 2008
Closing:
November 9, 2008

Theater: Al Hirschfeld Theatre / 302 West 45th Street, New York, NY, 10036

Synopsis: 

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…"; it was the French Revolution, against which Dickens’ classic tale of vengeance, redemption, sacrifice — and love — comes to vivid life.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF A Tale Of Two Cities

    Revolution (and Love) on Their Minds

    BEN BRANTLEY

    September 19, 2008: So much for all those satisfyingly cheap jokes a critic might have been making this morning about “A Tale of Two Cities," the lumpish musical adaptation of the beloved Charles Dickens novel, which opened on Thursday at the Al Hirschfeld Theater.

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  • NEWSDAY REVIEW OF A Tale Of Two Cities

    A Tale of Two Cities" is a middling Masterpiece Musical, a paint-by-numbers throwback to the late - and, in this corner, unlamented - heyday of novelized epics on turntables. It has lots of nice period costumes and good actors singing their lungs inside out on material that all sounds the same.

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  • AM NEW YORK REVIEW OF A Tale Of Two Cities

    The pre-Broadway buzz surrounding "A Tale of Two Cities" had nothing to do with Charles Dickens. Its lead actor, James Barbour, got caught up in a sticky, scandalous legal quagmire that we'd rather not describe yet again. But regardless of his controversial and criminal past, Barbour is the best asset of this otherwise awful musical.

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  • BROADWAYSPACE.COM REVIEW OF A Tale Of Two Cities

  • USA TODAY REVIEW OF A Tale Of Two Cities

    Do you think Les Miserables stands as the greatest accomplishment in the history of musical theater? Would you argue that the musical version of Jane Eyre that plodded onto Broadway in 2000 never got the respect it deserved?

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  • REVIEW OF A Tale Of Two Cities

    With flags waving high, the thunder of timpani and a cast of 35 powerful voices staring off into the distance and singing that “it won’t be long until tomorrow is today,” fans of big, robust period costume musicals (a la Les Misérables and The Scarlet Pimpernel) are likely to be utterly enraptured with "A Tale of Two Cities". Borrowing more than a page from its lucrative predecessors, "Tale" succeeds as a rousing crowd-pleaser with vibrant harmonies, intricate lighting and an elaborate multi-level set.

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  • THEATERMANIA REVIEW OF A Tale Of Two Cities

    When word got around that daily changes were being made to the new tuner A Tale of Two Cities, a waggish friend of mine said, "Maybe they're adding a third city." They haven't, but first-time composer-lyricist-librettist Jill Santoriello and her colleagues still needed to do something radical to raise their blatant attempt at cloningLes Miserables above the level of Anglo-Gallic mediocrity that now appears on the stage of the Al Hirschfeld Theatre.

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  • ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW OF A Tale Of Two Cities

    Haven't we been here before? And in much better crafted company?.

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  • NY1 REVIEW OF A Tale Of Two Cities

    The similarities between the new musical “A Tale of Two Cities” and "Les Miserables" are unmistakable. From the moment the first chords are struck, you may get the sense you've heard it all before.

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