Pretty Woman BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Matthew Murphy
  • NY TIMES

  • DEADLINE

  • WSJ

  • CHIC TRIB

  • VARIETY

Opening Night:
August 16, 2018
Closing:
Open Ended

Theater: Nederlander Theatre / 208 West 41st Street, New York, NY, 10036

Synopsis: 

One of the most beloved romances of all time is now on Broadway! Pretty Woman: The Musical, features direction and choreography by two-time Tony Award® winner Jerry Mitchell (Kinky Boots, Legally Blonde, Hairspray), an original score by Grammy® winner Bryan Adams (“Summer of ’69,” “Everything I Do”) and his longtime songwriting partner Jim Vallance, and a book by the movie’s legendary director Garry Marshall and screenwriter J.F. Lawton. Starring Samantha Barks and Andy Karl.

Once upon a time in the late ’80s, unlikely soulmates Vivian and Edward overcame all odds to find each other… and themselves. Experience the moments you love from the movie — and get to know these iconic characters in a whole new way — in this dazzlingly theatrical take on a love story for the ages. Brought to life by a powerhouse creative team representing the best of music, Hollywood and Broadway, Pretty Woman: The Musical will lift your spirits and light up your heart.

BUY TICKETS BUY GROUP TICKETS
  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Pretty Woman

    Chasing Shopworn Dreams in ‘Pretty Woman: The Musical’

    Ben Brantley

    August 16, 2018: No one should have had to step into that red dress again. I’m talking about the long, strapless number that Julia Roberts wore in the 1990 film “Pretty Woman,” in a moment of pure, movie-magic apotheosis. Let me refresh your memory of that occasion before I proceed to the less pleasant topic of “Pretty Woman: The Musical,” which opened on Thursday night at the Nederlander Theater without Ms. Roberts in the title role. In the movie, Ms. Roberts’s character, a prostitute named Vivian Ward, is going to her first opera (all too appropriately, “La Traviata”) with her date and client, Edward Lewis, a very rich and emotionally frozen businessman played by Richard Gere. She materializes with coltish grace and freshness in said dress, and the smitten Mr. Gere presents her with a small box, containing an obscenely expensive necklace. He playfully snaps it open and closed, and Ms. Roberts erupts into a spontaneous shout of laughter that totally and improbably dispels the creepy transactional haze of the scene.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • DEADLINE REVIEW OF Pretty Woman

    Broadway’s ‘Pretty Woman’ Musical: All Dressed Up With No Place To Go

    Greg Evans

    August 16, 2018: I might not be the target audience for Pretty Woman – The Musical, seeing as how I was never a fan of Pretty Woman – The Movie. Just never thought it was cute, funny or charming when Richard Gere, in that 1990 star-making movie, jokingly snapped shut that proffered jewelry box, drawing the startled, wide-mouthed guffaw that transformed Julia Roberts into Julia Roberts. And that was 10 years before the Millennium, well before the Laugh became schtick, and well well before #MeToo and Time’s Up did in – to anyone who was listening – the romanticization of sexual commodification in Hollywood. Follow-your-dream American Idol platitudes and ’90s nostalgia don’t come close to explaining how or why Pretty Woman made its Cinderella trip from rom-com guilty pleasure to cloying, regressive Broadway musical. Bland MOR songs, costumes mistaking gaudy for glitzy and a sugary lead performance add up to one very smudged, very ill-fitting glass slipper.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • WALL STREET JOURNAL REVIEW OF Pretty Woman

    Super-Safe Sex on Broadway

    Terry Teachout

    August 16, 2018: No doubt there’s a politically correct opinion of “Pretty Woman,” Garry Marshall’s stupendously popular 1990 movie romcom. I wouldn’t know: I can’t figure out whether Degrading to Women takes intersectional precedence over Sex Work Is Good. Fortunately, to lift a line from my worthy colleagues in the judicial branch, we need not reach this issue in order to render judgment on the new musical version of Mr. Marshall’s film. Not that “Pretty Woman” is terrible—it’s just mediocre, albeit to a mind-boggling degree. The only noteworthy thing about “Pretty Woman,” in fact, is the incalculably wide gap between the time, money and talent that went into moving it from screen to stage and the comatose tedium of the results currently on view at the Nederlander Theatre.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE REVIEW OF Pretty Woman

    ‘Pretty Woman’ on Broadway is great fun, starring Samantha Barks with a heart of gold

    Chris Joned

    August 16, 2018: Samantha Barks, the truly formidable young star of “Pretty Woman: The Musical,” achieves something close to a miracle at the Nederlander Theatre. With the help of her savvy director, Jerry Mitchell, this uber-confident, pitch-perfect newbie Brit makes her end-of-the-’80s streetwalker with Cinderella dreams at once smart, vulnerable, really good at her job and fully capable of saving her emotionally stunted, handsome corporate prince from the excesses of his self-absorbed era. This is a populist, romantic, modestly scaled show aimed squarely at offering a fun night out for Broadway’s most lucrative demographic: women old enough to remember the 1990 film, which has grossed nearly half a billion bucks worldwide. Who would not want a piece of that brand?

    READ THE REVIEW
  • VARIETY REVIEW OF Pretty Woman

    An iconic movie bids to become “My Fair Lady of the Evening,” but isn’t quite so loverly.

    Bob Verini

    August 16, 2018: When the 1990 movie comedy “Pretty Woman” catapulted Julia Roberts to stardom, it was widely reported that Disney and late director Garry Marshall had tweaked J.F. Lawton’s downbeat prostitute/john tale “Three Thousand” into a sumptuous rom-com, to the profit of all concerned. Its newest incarnation sanitizes the tale completely. With anything mature or sensual systematically removed, “Pretty Woman: The Musical” goes all-in on fantasy, casting two sizzling talents, Samantha Barks and Andy Karl, as bland, pretty people singing pretty Bryan Adams-Jim Vallance tunes with nothing much at stake. Stubbornly inconsequential, it’s a morally uplifting fairy tale of which everyone, young and old alike, can be skeptical. The Lawton-Marshall libretto fundamentally sticks to the screenplay line by line, joke by joke. Multimillionaire corporate raider Edward Lewis (Karl) hops a brand-new 1989 Lotus Esprit and, in an impulse maybe only Hugh Grant could explain, whisks streetwalker Vivian Ward (Barks) from Hollywood Blvd. to his Beverly Hills hotel penthouse. A $300 night of whoopie turns into a $3,000 week of companionship among the niteries, country clubs and opera houses of the super-rich, and to hear the script tell it, each rescues the other: He pulls her out of The Life, while she teaches him to Really Feel.

    READ THE REVIEW

BEST REVIEWED SHOWS

    JerseyBoys    Phantom    Motown    Wicked
DOWNLOAD THE APP