Oslo BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: T. Charles Erickson
  • NY TIMES

  • TIME OUT

  • AMNY

  • VARIETY

  • DAILY BEAST

Opening Night:
April 13, 2017
Closing:
Open Ended

Theater: Vivian Beaumont / 150 West 65th Street, New York, NY, 10023

Synopsis: 

A darkly funny and sweeping new work, OSLO is about a group of Israeli, Palestinian, Norwegian and American men and women struggling to overcome their fears, mistrust and hatred of each other. As he did with such wit and intelligence in Blood and Gifts, Rogers once again presents a deeply personal story set against a complex historical canvas: a story about the individuals behind world history and their all too human ambitions.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Oslo

    ‘Oslo’ Fills a Large Canvas in a Thrilling Production

    Ben Brantley

    Some works of art cry out for large canvases. Though it is sparing in its use of scenery or anything approaching spectacle, J. T. Rogers’s “Oslo,” an against-the-odds story of international peacemaking, is undeniably a big play, as expansive and ambitious as any in recent Broadway history. So it is particularly gratifying to announce that it has been allowed to stretch to its full height in the thrilling production that opened on Thursday night, directed with a master’s hand by Bartlett Sher.

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  • TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW OF Oslo

    TimeOut Review Of Oslo

    Adam Feldman

    The approach to politics practiced in (and preached by) Oslo is so different from our current discourse that it might seems quaint if it weren’t so persuasive. J.T. Rogers’s account of 1993 meetings between Israelis and Palestinians, which led to the breakthrough Oslo Accords, is a testament to the potential value of diplomacy, cooperation, mutual recognition of opponents’ humanity and—contra the now-trending WikiLeaks ethos—backroom secrecy. Arriving at those things was not easy even then: As Rogers lays out, in a narrative flush with historical detail, it took the ingenious private openness and public duplicity of a well-connected Norwegian couple, Terje Rød-Larsen (Jefferson Mays) and Mona Juul (Jennifer Ehle), to get the warring parties to the negotiating table—and, no less crucially, the dining table.

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  • AM NEW YORK REVIEW OF Oslo

    Diplomacy takes center stage in J.T. Rogers’ well-crafted play

    Matt Windman

    International diplomacy isn’t easy — especially when it involves getting two warring populations to make hard concessions — and neither is “Oslo,” J.T. Rogers’ three-hour ensemble drama depicting the back-and-forth backroom negotiations leading up to the 1993 Oslo Peace Accords between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization.

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  • VARIETY REVIEW OF Oslo

    How Broadway’s ‘Oslo’ Makes a Thriller Out of Diplomacy

    Gordon Cox

    When “Oslo” opened Off Broadway in the middle of July, it sounded like the opposite of summer popcorn fare. The latest play by J.T. Rogers was a meaty evening, a thinking theatergoer’s chronicle of the back-channel diplomacy that resulted in the Oslo Accords of 1993. It was brainy, it was challenging, and it was three hours long.

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  • THE DAILY BEAST REVIEW OF Oslo

    How Norway Brokered Middle East Peace: Review of ‘Oslo’

    Tim Teeman

    April 13, 2017: What keeps coming to mind as you’re watching the extraordinary Oslo is how particular the mechanics behind the momentous can be.

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