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BROADWAY REVIEWS

Act One
After Midnight
Aladdin
All The Way
Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Book Of Mormon, The
Bridges Of Madison County, The
Bullets Over Broadway
Chicago
Cripple Of Inishmaan, The
A Gentleman's Guide To Love And Murder
If/then
Jersey Boys
Kinky Boots
Lady Day At Emerson's Bar & Grill
Les Miserables
Lion King, The
Mamma Mia!
Matilda The Musical
Mothers And Sons
Motown The Musical
Newsies
Of Mice And Men
Once
Phantom Of The Opera
Pippin
A Raisin In The Sun
Realistic Joneses, The
Rock Of Ages
Rocky
Rodgers And Hammerstein's Cinderella
Violet
Wicked


OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS

50 Shades! The Musical
Avenue Q
Berenstain Bears Live! In Family Matters, The Musical, The
Blue Man Group
Cirque Du Soleil: Amulana
Cougar The Musical
Disaster!
Heathers The Musical
Heir Apparent, The
Iluminate
Isolde
King Lear
King Lear (london)
La Soiree
Library, The
Most Deserving, The
Murder For Two
My Mother Has 4 Noses
Mystery Of Irma Vep, The
A Night With Janis Joplin
Queen Of The Night
A Respectable Widow Takes To Vulgarity
Satchmo At The Waldorf
Sex Tips For Straight Women From A Gay Man
Shadow Of The Hummingbird, The
Sistas: The Musical
Stomp
Tales From Red Vienna
Threepenny Opera, The


REVIEW ARCHIVE

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OFF-BROADWAY REVIEWS



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Broadway Review Broadway Review Broadway Review Broadway Review Broadway Review

Synopsis:

Off-Broadway Tickets
Off-Broadway Tickets

Broadway Reviews

NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The night itself is said to smile at the escapades of the addled lovers in "A Little Night Music," Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler’s erotic waltz of a show from 1973. But the expression that hovers over Trevor Nunn’s revival, which opened Sunday night at the Walter Kerr Theater, feels dangerously close to a smirk."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Leaves are decaying in soggy piles in the city’s parks, and the first cold snap has come and gone, awakening anxiety about the prospect of a chilly winter. But permanent sunshine can confidently be predicted for the vicinity of the St. James Theater, where the joyous revival of “Finian’s Rainbow” opened on Thursday night."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Have you ever wondered just how it is that Heather Locklear and Tommy Lee of Mötley Crüe became a couple? What tore apart the great love between Loni Anderson and Burt Reynolds?"

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"What is the secret to the longevity of "Perfect Crime," the longest-running musical or play in New York? No one knows for sure, but it must help that its star, Catherine Russell, who has played all but four performances . . ."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"What’s big and green and sings pop-rock anthems while tearing off the limbs of evildoers? The Toxic Avenger, the mutant superhero born of a shlocky cult movie who has now been given the supreme honor of inspiring a stage musical."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Those eternal adversaries, irresistible force and immovable object, clash with gusto in the first act of the otherwise flabby revival of Tennessee Williams’s Cat on a Hot Tin Roof which opened Thursday night at the Broadhurst Theater."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"There aren’t a lot of laughs in A Catered Affair, the undramatic new musical drama of disappointed lives in the age of Eisenhower, which opened Thursday night at the Walter Kerr Theater."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"A single breath of suspense, as faint as a half-stifled sigh, occasionally stirs the inert revival of Clifford Odets’s Country Girl, which opened on Sunday night at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theater."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"A single breath of suspense, as faint as a half-stifled sigh, occasionally stirs the inert revival of Clifford Odets’s Country Girl, which opened on Sunday night at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theater."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Brace yourself for a shock, gentle theatergoer. There’s no delicate way of putting this. Cry-Baby, the latest Broadway musical based on a John Waters movie, is ... tasteless."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"David Hyde Pierce steps into full-fledged Broadway stardom with his performance here. Curtains lies on the stage like a promisingly gaudy string of firecrackers, waiting in vain for that vital, necessary spark to set it off."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The new musical Glory Days may be the youngest-feeling show about being young ever to land on Broadway."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"A little-known story of heroism is transformed into theatrical hokum in “Irena’s Vow,” a play by Dan Gordon about a young Polish woman who helped a dozen Jews survive the Holocaust. Susceptible audiences will want to practice their hisses and prime their tear ducts before attending this efficiently manipulative drama covering territory that is rather too frequently exploited for its undeniable emotional force."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Great works of art often tote heavy baggage. Yet the revival of August Wilson’s “Joe Turner’s Come and Gone,” a drama of indisputable greatness, feels positively airborne. Much of Bartlett Sher’s splendid production, which opened Thursday night at the Belasco Theater, moves with the engaging ease of lively, casual conversation."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"I wish I had met Kay Thompson, the creative whirlwind who inspirits the second act of Liza Minnelli’s new show, “Liza’s at the Palace ...,” or simply had the chance to sit at her feet and absorb her presence. From the moment Ms. Minnelli joins forces with a male singing and dancing quartet to resurrect parts of a famous nightclub act Thompson created in the late 1940s and early ’50s with the Williams Brothers, the Palace Theater blasts off into orbit.."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"What makes this one a must-see is Mr. Stewart’s thrilling recognition that his character is as close kin to the fatally introspective Hamlet as he is to power-wielding men of ill will like Richard III."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Rent, Jonathan Larson's luminous, youthful musical that started off at the tiny New York Theater Workshop on East Fourth Street in February, opened on Broadway last night at the Nederlander Theater . . ."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Global warming is seriously bad news for polar bears and other arctic critters, but it’s been hell on some unendangered species too, like snow-loving New Yorkers. Having grown up in a sunny California suburb, in a family that regarded skiing as a deplorably extravagant way to acquire a broken leg, I became snow-crazed as soon as I started visiting New York in the chillier months."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"That Spamalot is the best new musical to open on Broadway this season is inarguable, but that's not saying much."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The look of the show feels like thought made visible, just as Mr. Sondheim’s ravishing score, performed with gleaming delicacy by a five-member ensemble."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The 43rd president of the United States, who is known for his gift for instant nicknames, is generously sharing his talent these days with audiences at the Cort Theater, home to “You’re Welcome America. A Final Night With George W Bush.” Toward the end of this largely unsurprising, uh, celebration of one man’s life and accomplishments, Mr. Bush, reincarnated by the comedian and movie star Will Ferrell, asks theatergoers to tell him their occupations, so he can give them the gift of his own pet names."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"History lessons and holiday warmth sit cozily alongside each other, like adjacent squares stitched together on a handmade quilt, in “A Civil War Christmas,” an ambitious, richly detailed and beautifully mounted new seasonal offering at the Long Wharf Theater here."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"All advice givers and etiquette experts — from Emily Post to Ann Landers, Miss Manners to Dan Savage — can probably agree on at least one admonition, namely that reading someone else’s diary is a no-no."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Those familiar with Manhattan gay culture may not find a lot of new ground in “Bash’d!,” billed as a “gay rap opera,” other than the novelty of a story recited entirely in verse and set to electronic rhythms and samples. Certainly not in the sexual explicitness of its lyrics, its nightclub argot or its star-crossed “Romeo and Romeo” narrative. But such an audience should be impressed by the passion of its convictions."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Male angst in the futon years is the subject of “Boys’ Life,” Howard Korder’s sensitive 1988 comedy about a trio of young urban dwellers trying to figure out what kind of men they want to be and what kind of women they want to love."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"It feels right that the proportions are all wrong in Sam Mendes’s seriously comic production of “The Cherry Orchard,” which opened on Wednesday night at the Harvey Theater of the Brooklyn Academy of Music. From the play’s opening scene, in which full-size grown-ups sit on child-size chairs in the dusty nursery of a too-large country house, a sense of scale gone haywire permeates this enjoyable maiden offering from the newly established Bridge Project, a trans-Atlantic collaboration of British and American theater artists produced by the Academy, the Old Vic of London and Neal Street Productions.."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"At some point in her explorations of a parallel universe, the adventurous young heroine (and title character) of the new musical “Coraline” discovers that reality isn’t what it used to be. “The more I walk, the more the trees look less like trees and more like the idea of trees,” she observes."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"For those of you for whom an annual reading of “A Christmas Carol” is as welcome as a two-ton fruitcake, the Atlantic and Druid Theater Companies have provided a savory alternative. That’s the fine imported Irish revival of Martin McDonagh’s “Cripple of Inishmaan,” which opened Sunday night at the Linda Gross Theater, offering its own salty variation on that sugarplum Tiny Tim. He is called Cripple Billy, and like Dickens’s beloved tot, he is sickly, misshapen and deeply wistful. I can promise you, though, that he isn’t about to say, “God bless us, everyone.”"

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"I must confess that “Distracted,” Lisa Loomer’s new play about attention deficit disorder, didn’t really grip my attention. And no, I honestly don’t think it’s because I’m suffering from the malady du jour that is explored so self-consciously in this overextended, sometimes amusing comedy. Well, not any more than most Americans in the Twittering, consciousness-splintering 21st century."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Louise Nevelson hasn’t let death go to her head. As reincarnated with disarming casualness and unimpeachable conviction by Mercedes Ruehl in “Edward Albee’s Occupant,” this imposingly flamboyant, Russian-born New York sculptor returns to the land of the living without a wisp of the oracular mysticism you might expect from someone who has spent two decades on the Other Side."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"One of the more terrifying privileges of marriage is the unparalleled power it lends its participants to wound, maim and annihilate, through the grim weapon of knowing exactly where the other half hurts. Adam and Jan — the middle-class husband and wife “going through a bad patch” in “Fifty Words,” Michael Weller’s bruising domestic drama, which opened Wednesday night at the Lucille Lortel Theater — appreciate the responsibilities of such knowledge."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Her teenage grandson, who has all the shortsightedness of youth, finds it hard to grasp that the gentle, Bible-quoting Lucretia Edwards was a seriously sensuous woman back in the day."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The dogs are yapping for their food. Stepdad forgot to pick up the dry cleaning. Mom is still half-dressed. The bag lunches are ready, but where are those darn car keys?"

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The gam parade at Radio City Music Hall is rolling once again, but this season the Rockettes have some pretty fierce competition in making lively use of the appendages most of us bipeds employ for more mundane purposes. The undulating forest of limbs in Martha Clarke’s celebrated “Garden of Earthly Delights” may not have the pop appeal of those high kickers uptown, but this singular work of dance theater is without doubt one of the most eerily hypnotic spectacles of flesh in motion ever put on a New York stage."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"What does it mean that the first African-American to win an Academy Award did so playing a loyal slave in a pulpy paean to the plantation South? What was it like to be a black vaudevillian on the road in an often-hostile America?"

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"For Cephus Miles, the hero of Samm-Art Williams’s play “Home,” life’s road is rough, circuitous and long. But it eventually circles back to just where it began, amid the tobacco fields of North Carolina that he tended as a boy. Cephus learned early to “love the land, the soft beautiful black sod,” and he never stopped missing its feel in his fingers when fate tore him away from his roots and threw him into the buffeting winds of history."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Hearts and flowers, moons and Junes do not figure prominently in the lexicon of Samuel Beckett, to say the least. When a besotted victim of Cupid’s arrow does feel the need to inscribe the name of his beloved on the world in the short story “First Love,” he does not go looking for the nearest tree trunk."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"In what he is calling his farewell show, Jackie Mason has finally settled on the perfect — or poifect, as he would say — title. The posters for his previous seven solo productions, all of which were on Broadway, hang above him onstage, revealing some duds (“Jackie Mason: Brand New”? Please.) and some good tries (“Prune Danish”)."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"A sick-souled Manhattan art dealer tries to resurrect his inner cowboy in “Kicking a Dead Horse,” the new play written and directed by Sam Shepard that opened on Monday night at the Public Theater. The first image we see makes it blue-sky clear that the quest has not been a roaring success."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"he milk of human you-know-what has not featured prominently in the work of Adam Rapp, the prolific playwright better known for dystopian dramas sometimes flecked with grisly violence. Charity plays a marginally larger role in Mr. Rapp’s new play, suggestively titled “Kindness,” which opened on Monday night at the Peter Jay Sharp Theater at Playwrights Horizons. But the threat of a bloody conclusion — a hammer to the skull of a cancer victim, no less — still hovers vaguely in the background of this listless drama about two Midwesterners who forge unlikely friendships with a pair of New Yorkers."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"What’s up with the guy in the rabbit suit? This is not a question you expect to ask while watching “Macbeth.”"

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"In the wake of the grim news about the bankrupt auto giants, commentators have been bemoaning the decline of American manufacturing. Please don’t share this sad news with the three crackpot inventors in the gloriously demented new show “Machines Machines Machines Machines Machines Machines Machines,” at Here Arts Center."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"“Little blessings!” titters one of the female characters in satisfaction in “The Marriage of Bette and Boo,” Christopher Durang’s carousel of horrors masquerading as a bubbly comedy. Little blessings?"

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"If the battered but unbroken stimulus package Washington finally serves up does not turn the trick, perhaps the answer to the country’s economic woes could be something a lot simpler. Bring back burlesque!"

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Nobody really listens to anybody else in “Mouth to Mouth,” Kevin Elyot’s mordant and mournful play about the limits of friendship and family. But the solipsistic Londoners in this deftly acted production from the New Group, which opened on Thursday night on Theater Row, clearly can’t stop thinking about one another."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"It’s easy to mistake Geoffrey Naufft’s “Next Fall” for being slighter than it is. Much of this artful, thoughtful and very moving story of a gay couple agonizing over differences in their religious faiths proceeds with the stinging breeziness of a cosmopolitan comedy."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Louise Nevelson hasn’t let death go to her head. As reincarnated with disarming casualness and unimpeachable conviction by Mercedes Ruehl in “Edward Albee’s Occupant,” this imposingly flamboyant, Russian-born New York sculptor returns to the land of the living without a wisp of the oracular mysticism you might expect from someone who has spent two decades on the Other Side."

Click here to read the full "" review.

NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The spring theater season this year is enticingly rich, both on Broadway and off. But I suspect it will not bring a Shakespeare production to equal the gripping “Othello” now blazing across the stage of the Duke on 42nd Street Theater, courtesy of Theater for a New Audience. I can say this partly because Shakespeare has unfortunately become a relative rarity on major New York stages, but primarily because this production is so terrific."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"It is far richer in wit, feeling and sheer personality than most of what is classified as musical theater in the neighborhood around Times Square these days,....bursting at the seams with melodic songs . . ."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The shimmering hands in the aggressively saucy new revival of “Pippin” at the Mark Taper Forum here are not, as you might assume, a tribute to Bob Fosse, who directed and choreographed the original Broadway production in 1972. Those wriggling digits are saying something too."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Anger is in the American bloodstream in “Prayer for My Enemy,” the provocative, confused and confusing new play by Craig Lucas. Separate incidents of road rage propel the most significant turns of plot in this thoughtful, fitful drama, which opened Tuesday night at Playwrights Horizons. And Mr. Lucas suggests that such eruptions are inevitable in a society in which hostility always simmers under the surface."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The New Group, a theater company that specializes in up close and personal ensemble work, now invites you to invade the privacy of a pair of newlyweds. But don’t worry. Even if you shudder at the idea of celebrity sex tapes and wedding-theme reality shows, this is one invitation you’ll probably want to accept."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Repressed whimsy, it seems, can build up and fester in a person, the way unexpressed rage or resentment does. The time comes when, to save your sanity, you just have to get it out of your system in one big, cleansing blast."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"A troubled, solitary man nearing the end of his life shares a living room with the ghosts from his past in “Saturn Returns,” a wintry new play by Noah Haidle that opened on Monday night at the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater at Lincoln Center. Shifting among scenes that cover more than half a century in the life of a happy husband who becomes a sudden widower and a bereft father, the play is a muted study in the constancy of loneliness and need."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Text messages are zipping this way and that, suffusing the suburban airwaves with digital indignation."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"For the record, Elevator Repair Service’s Sound and the Fury (April Seventh, 1928) lasts over two and a half hours, counting intermission. Or that’s what my watch said at the end of this hypnotic re-creation of the opening section of William Faulkner’s 1929 novel. But I really had no idea of how long I had been sitting in a state of rapt, oddly contented confusion at New York Theater Workshop, where the production opened on Tuesday night. The minutes had shrunk, stretched, flown, crept, sagged and stood still, sometimes all at once."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"When it comes to making people question their sanity, few inventions have been as effective as the telephone. Surely you’ve had the experience of droning out a monologue to a friend and suddenly realizing that the connection has been lost and that you have been rattling on to no one. Or maybe to someone altogether different than whom you thought you were speaking with."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Peg, a bourbon-steeped, whiskey-voiced screenwriter who finds herself on the rocks in Omaha in 1949, says she used to be MGM’s go-to gal for script editing. But if Peg (played by the ever commanding Kathleen Turner) is feeling underemployed, then why, oh why, doesn’t she take a blue pencil to the play in which she appears?"

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The obscure has the air of the obvious in “Three Changes,” the wan and sinister new play by Nicky Silver that opened on Tuesday night at Playwrights Horizons."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"If the figures in wax museums could walk, talk and play the piano, they would closely resemble the leading characters in “The Tin Pan Alley Rag,” a bio-musical about an imaginary encounter between Irving Berlin and Scott Joplin. This stodgy and soporific show, which opened on Tuesday night at the Laura Pels Theater of the Roundabout, transforms the lives and careers of two of America’s great popular composers into two hours of theatrical elevator music.."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Nothing, but nothing, feels settled in Austin Pendleton’s hyperkinetic new production of “Uncle Vanya,” which opened on Thursday night at the Classic Stage Company with a cast that includes Denis O’Hare, Peter Sarsgaard and Maggie Gyllenhaal. Now you might argue that an agitated indecisiveness suits the plays of Chekhov, in which people trapped in the provinces are itching to escape their dull lives."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Life unfolds in a series of exquisite contradictions in “Waves,” a remarkable, genre-defying work from the National Theater of Great Britain that raises the bar for literary adaptations. The world that is so magically summoned in this improbable page-to-stage translation of “The Waves,” Virginia Woolf’s most challenging novel, is one of fragmentation and flux, of impenetrable solidity and ghostly transparency, of simultaneous bloom and decay."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Don’t feel guilty about laughing so hard at “Why Torture Is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them,” Christopher Durang’s hilarious and disturbing new comedy about all-American violence. Though it tackles and practically tickles to death subjects that are sensitive to the point of rawness just now, the production, which opened on Monday night at the Public Theater, has a healthier heart and conscience than many a more pious play."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The Fates 3, the voluptuous trio that sings a mean backup to daily events in a place called the House of Light, say that “Vogue is the official language” of their world. But though the poses of high fashion figure flamboyantly here, this pronouncement doesn’t begin to do justice to the richness of . . ."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Jealousy poisons the light that hangs over the kingdom of Sicilia in the wondrous first acts of “The Winter’s Tale,” directed by Sam Mendes at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. The country’s monarch, Leontes, walks through his palace wrapped in a miasmic, jaundice-colored glow that isolates him from those he loves even as it infects them. As played with shivery brilliance by Simon Russell Beale, Leontes is a cruel and dangerous man — fatally irrational and unjustified in his suspicions that his wife has betrayed him — and yet you keep thinking that it’s not his fault, any more than if he had caught the plague."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"“Roberta!” the drunken man calls out in his sleep, his voice as lonely as a train whistle on a prairie. A little boy who overhears him thinks it sounds as if somebody were being murdered. But the man’s roommates in a small-town boarding house in Harrison, Tex., are more perplexed than alarmed. “Who’s Roberta?” they ask one another."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"The lady who lives for illusion has never felt more real. Playing that immortal bruised Southern lily Blanche DuBois, in Liv Ullmann’s heart-stopping production of “A Streetcar Named Desire” at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Cate Blanchett soars spectacularly on the gossamer wings of fantasies that allow her character to live with herself. But you never doubt for a second that this brave, silly, contradictory and endlessly compelling woman is thoroughly and inescapably of this world."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Passion burns cold in Robert Wilson’s trance-inducing production of “Quartett,” Heiner Müller’s ruthless reimagining of Choderlos de Laclos’s 18th-century novel “Les Liaisons Dangereuses.” Lights of many colors dye the all-too-mortal flesh of the figures assembled here to recall the blood-drawing games of lust they once shared. Sometimes their faces glow a reptilian green; on other occasions they are drenched in satanic red."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Even if you have already had your fill of heated debate about the crisis in American health care — informed, opinionated or just plain batty — do not go in fear of “Let Me Down Easy,” the new solo show from Anna Deavere Smith, which opened Wednesday night at the Second Stage Theater. The buzz words that have been filling the airwaves like swarms of gnats (“public option,” “death panels”) make no appearances in this engrossing collection of testimonials about life, death and the care of the ailing body."

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NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW:

"Sometimes New York seems like a small town, as the saying goes. But it seems to have shrunk to the size of a venti latte — no, make that a tall latte — in “The Singing Forest,” a play by Craig Lucas that opened on Tuesday night at the Public Theater. This ambitious but muddled comedy-drama asks us to believe that three generations of an angst-ridden family, some of whom have not spoken to each other in decades, happen to frequent the same Starbucks."

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ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW:

"The first Broadway revival of "A Little Night Music," the enchanting, moonstruck musical based on the Ingmar Bergman film "Smiles of a Summer Night," is a curious affair. There are some lovely moments, most of them supplied by Angela Lansbury, but too much of this adult, sophisticated show, which opened Sunday at the Walter Kerr Theatre, seems forced, boisterous and a little crude."

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ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW:

"That delectable bit of musical-theater blarney called "Finian's Rainbow" has found its way back to Broadway for the first time in nearly half a century, its charms undiminished, particularly its buoyant score."

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NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"A shimmering ensemble that honors America's great poet of bruised humanity."

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NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"How bold to make a Broadway musical on such restrained material as A Catered Affair. How sad that the results are so glum. Despite the dedication of a fine cast, including Faith Prince, Tom Wopat and author Harvey Fierstein, this is a colorless little piece of '50s social realism about a Bronx family that isn't so much emotionally repressed as emotionally deficient."

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NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"Forget reports of real backstage drama at the revival of Clifford Odets' 1950 backstage drama, The Country Girl. Whatever troubles did or did not propel Mike Nichols' staging to last night's opening - including a star unable to remember lines and a director willing to cut entire scenes - the result is a subtle, engrossing and deeply straightforward shaping of a far-from-perfect script."

Click here to read the full "" review.

NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"Forget reports of real backstage drama at the revival of Clifford Odets' 1950 backstage drama, The Country Girl. Whatever troubles did or did not propel Mike Nichols' staging to last night's opening - including a star unable to remember lines and a director willing to cut entire scenes - the result is a subtle, engrossing and deeply straightforward shaping of a far-from-perfect script."

Click here to read the full "" review.

NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"Cry-Baby, which opened last night at the Marquis Theatre, is pleasantly demented and - deep in the sweet darkness of its loopy heart - more true to the cheerful subversion of a John Waters movie than its sentimental big sister Hairspray."

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NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"It's a modest show, barely 90 minutes in length, with not much plot but plenty of emotion as it attempts to sort out the thoughts and feelings of these young men who still have some growing up to do -- and maybe growing out of relationships with their high school pals."

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ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW:

""Irena's Vow" may be melodramatic and occasionally manipulative, but the emotions this stage biography stirs in theatergoers are genuine, a testament to the bravery and tenacity of the woman whose real-life story is being told. The play, which opened Sunday at Broadway's Walter Kerr Theatre after a successful off-Broadway run, is the memoir of Irena Gut Opdyke, played here by a canny, eminently theatrical Tovah Feldshuh."

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ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW:

"Lost souls populate "Joe Turner's Come and Gone," August Wilson's magical, mystical tale of early 20th-century displacement that Lincoln Center Theater has brought back to Broadway for the first time in more than two decades."

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NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"Britney who? Liza Minnelli is not having a comeback as much as an actual resurrection on Broadway in "Liza's at the Palace…!," a slick and exuberant time-capsule that opened last night in the theater where both she and her late mother, Judy Garland, have famously lived their ups and downs in publi"

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AM NEW YORK REVIEW:

"Upon entering the Helen Hayes Theatre, you’ll notice the rectangular pieces of white paper that cover the floor. It’s snow. Or at least it’s supposed to be. You can pick up and crush it in your hand. Or maybe throw a little at your neighbor."

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NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"Eric Idle and Mike Nichols have indeed fashioned a Holy Grail of a big, crowd-pleasing Broadway musical comedy. The show slays 'em like Excalibur."

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NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"Fear not. It's still magic."

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ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW:

"Already feeling masochistically nostalgic for the misadventures of the previous presidential administration? You can relive those eight years — and more — in “You’re Welcome America. A Final Night With George W. Bush,” Will Ferrell’s merciless and often blisteringly funny raunch roast of the former chief executive who left the Oval Office less than three weeks ago."

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NEWSDAY REVIEW:

"Let's not get too distracted figuring out how to categorize Passing Strange, the stranger-in-a-strange-land original passing for a Broadway musical at the Belasco Theatre. What's important is that the thing - part indie-rock concert, part boho-art project, part coming-of-age black-identity crisis, part hipster travelogue - is all smart and all enjoyable and all very good for the theater."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"It has been enough of a gift having Angela Lansbury back on Broadway in recent seasons. But it's particular cause for celebration that she is appearing, for the first time in more than 25 years, in a musical. And not just any musical — a work by Stephen Sondheim, with whom she has already made magic more than once."

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HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW:

"Things are great in Glocca Morra. A theatrical pot of gold awaits anyone who enters the St. James Theatre, where the magical revival of "Finian's Rainbow" has opened. The classic musical, receiving its first Broadway revival in nearly half a century, has the kind of score, written by Burton Lane (music) and Yip Harburg (lyrics), that can still make any theatergoer swoon."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"Phylicia Rashad's Big Mama has some undeniably funny moments, and a few poignant ones; but it's another case of a normally astute, elegant actress adding too much sauce to an already spicy part. Lisa Arrindell Anderson is even more histrionic as Maggie's conniving, annoying sister-in-law."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"As pop culture grows coarser and snarkier by the minute, a quiet revolution is taking place on Broadway. With new revivals of classics such as Gypsy and South Pacific and original shows as diverse as last season's Spring Awakening and Grey Gardens and this year's Passing Strange and In the Heights, writers and directors are rejecting the glib satire and empty bombast that have cheapened commercial musical theater in recent decades. A Catered Affair, which opened Thursday at the Walter Kerr Theatre, shares with those musicals an emphasis on characters drawn with passion and compassion, and handled with that most quaint of virtues: dignity."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"As a rule, camp-driven musicals shouldn't be encouraged any more than Lenora is. But at least Cry-Baby will make you smile, and laugh, without patronizing you, or anyone else."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"In Curtains the new musical that opened Thursday at Broadway's Al Hirschfeld Theatre, the jokes may be cheap, but some of them come at the expense of theater critics."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"There is at least one reason to be grateful that Irena's Vow (* * out of four) has arrived on Broadway: After this production, it's doubtful that anyone will be itching to produce a stage adaptation of Schindler's List."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"No playwright understood better than August Wilson that freedom is, at least in part, a state of mind. And none of Wilson's plays addressed the particular challenges faced by black Americans seeking it more directly or movingly than Joe Turner's Come and Gone, now being revived by Lincoln Center Theater."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"It may be time for a moratorium on Liza Minnelli's career death watch. This in defatigable performer has endured so many problems - personal and physical - and has had so many comebacks that, in terms of sheer drama, she's outdone her famous mother."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"Overstated but fascinating. Stewart looks as lean and spry as a decathlete. He's an older Macbeth, certainly, but a well-preserved one."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"The hilarious yet haunting winter spectacular Slava's Snowshow, created by and starring master clown Slava Polunin and now playing a limited engagement at the Helen Hayes Theatre, is literally taking Broadway by snowstorm. Previously seen in New York a few years ago at the Union Square Theatre, the show is filled with magical images -- including a truly impressive blizzard that blows through the entire theater in the show's finale."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"In Monty Python's Spamalot, the new musical "lovingly ripped off" from the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, England's great leader of legend is at once reduced and rejuvenated by some of the funniest antics introduced on a Broadway stage since ... well, since the dawn of another musical lovingly ripped off from a cult comedy classic: Mel Brooks' The Producers."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"Sunday, with its focus on the tension between life and art, is one of his most achingly tender works, and Buntrock (director) underscores its visceral punch."

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"It's tough to say who should be more offended by You're Welcome America: A Final Night With George W. Bush (?½ out of four): the 43rd president's most ardent admirers or his most rigorous critic"

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USA TODAY REVIEW:

"Who knew that it would take a bunch of German teenagers and Eurocentric bohemians to rehabilitate the American musical? " & "Strange's playful, passionate presentation will inspire comparisons to rock musicals such as Hair and Godspell. In the end, though, Strange is truly unlike anything you've seen on Broadway. Let's hope that it helps inspire more musical-theater artists — and producers — to dare to be different."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"The most atypical of Ingmar Bergman's celebrated films, "Smiles of a Summer Night" brought ripe carnality and a delicious sense of irony to its fin-de-siecle gathering of romantically muddled Swedes. Those same intoxicating elements were translated to "A Little Night Music," Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler's exquisite waltz-musical inspired by the film. Reviving the 1973 show, director Trevor Nunn brings a blunt, heavy hand where a glissando touch is required, but the wit and sophistication of the material are sufficient to withstand even this phlegmatic staging. A handful of magnetic leads provides further insurance against the uneven production."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"What better time for a show that makes gentle mockery of that incurable habit of building the illusion of wealth on nothing more than a dream and a credit line, while also offering the rose-tinted consolation that such folly will turn out fine in the end? But it's not so much the uncanny appropriateness of its pixified fairy tale as the enveloping warmth of Burton Lane's melodies and the spry wit of Yip Harburg's lyrics that make "Finian's Rainbow" such an infectious charmer. Rather than try to get around the 1947 musical's daffy story by hammering the social satire, director-choreographer Warren Carlyle and his winning cast simply embrace its quaint idiosyncrasies."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"While Debbie Allen's inexperience as a director shows in pedestrian physical staging with a tendency toward heavy-handedness, she lucks out where it most matters -- with her powerhouse cast."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"Musicals are generally expected to heighten emotions, to transport the characters to some elevated plane of self-expression, whether it's love or loss, laughs or sorrow. So it seems an almost radical step when a show is as deliberately and uniformly subdued as A Catered Affair, adapted from Paddy Chayefsky's 1955 teleplay and Gore Vidal's screenplay for the movie the following year. Composer John Bucchino's melodious score never seeks to overpower the action but instead to feed the dramatic texture, subtly interwoven with book writer Harvey Fierstein's dialogue to create a show that's less a conventional musical than a semi-sung play."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"After two decades in which he was minimally represented on Broadway, Clifford Odets resurfaced two seasons ago with a superlative revival of his poetic 1935 debut Awake and Sing! and now with Mike Nichols' staging of The Country Girl, written 15 years later. The two plays are worlds apart: The politics, richly populated ensemble and pinpoint sociology of the early work gave way to a more sentimental vehicle for three stars in the popular backstage melodrama. But even if the 1950 play is a lesser achievement, the dramatist's singing idiomatic speech and his affecting insights into the erosion of the human spirit still make for enthralling theater."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"After two decades in which he was minimally represented on Broadway, Clifford Odets resurfaced two seasons ago with a superlative revival of his poetic 1935 debut Awake and Sing! and now with Mike Nichols' staging of The Country Girl, written 15 years later. The two plays are worlds apart: The politics, richly populated ensemble and pinpoint sociology of the early work gave way to a more sentimental vehicle for three stars in the popular backstage melodrama. But even if the 1950 play is a lesser achievement, the dramatist's singing idiomatic speech and his affecting insights into the erosion of the human spirit still make for enthralling theater."

Click here to read the full "" review.

VARIETY REVIEW:

"As the title character memorably told his good-girl-gone-bad sweetheart in John Waters' 1990 movie, "You got it, Allison. You got it raw." But one problem for Cry-Baby was that the underground trashmeister's rebel rawness was diluted into benign, kitschy satire in his attempt to follow Hairspray with a further step toward the mainstream. So it's perhaps not surprising that watered-down Waters has yielded a flavorless Broadway musical that revels in its down-and-dirtiness yet remains stubbornly synthetic."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"Hyde Pierce, with his polished comic timing and more than serviceable singing skills, is the (show's) most invaluable asset. His detective is a memorable comic creation who rescues this show from being just another self-satirizing musical spoof."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"An irritating offshoot of the digital revolution is that it's democratized the filmmaking process, opening the floodgates for kids straight out of school with no life experience and no stories to tell to start making navel-gazing movies. Beyond the small-time local level or the ubiquitous solo show, theater is mostly spared that indignity because it costs more, requires more collaborators and demands an audience. But occasionally, one such immature self-indulgence slips through, such as Glory Days, which slipped all the way through to Broadway."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"The conviction of Tovah Feldshuh's transformative performance drives "Irena's Vow," but it's the compelling true story of courage and heroism that makes Dan Gordon's by-the-numbers script so moving. Recounting the experiences of Irena Gut, a young Polish Catholic housekeeper who sheltered a dozen Jews in the basement of the German major for whom she worked during WWII, the play draws its power more from the nobility of its sentiments and the events it portrays than from the writer's over-explanatory treatment of them. Still, if the audible sobs in the theater at key moments are any indication, audiences may be willing to overlook the clunky dramaturgy."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"When the cast explodes into a rowdy Juba in "Joe Turner's Come and Gone," their joyous, spirit-summoning dance suggests roots stretching back to African tribal movement and forward through tap and jazz right up to hip-hop. That same panoramic breadth is reflected in the characters themselves, their histories bound to the still-raw wounds of slavery while their hopes and destinies reach far into a future mapped out in ongoing struggle. August Wilson's gift for storytelling has rarely been more beguiling than in this lyrical 1986 drama, and in his searing revival, director Bartlett Sher makes every note strong and true."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"In her return to Broadway after nearly 10 years’ absence, Minnelli had the opening-night audience in the palm of her hand from her first moment onstage -- striking that signature, one-arm-pointed-skyward pose, appropriately framed by a giant pink triangle of light. Even without the occasional shouts of “I love you, Liza,” the affection flowing from the crowd hung in the air like perfume."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"One of the qualities that resonates most unexpectedly in Patrick Stewart's interpretation of the butchering tyrant is the mental frailty of a man overpowered and undone by his own ruthless ambition. Exactly how well Stewart is served by the blood-soaked flamboyance of Rupert Goold's overburdened production will be a matter of taste, but the rising-star Brit director's "Macbeth" is as cinematic as it is boldly theatrical. It may not always elucidate the plot or characters to best advantage but it sure keeps you glued."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"Rent is the best show in years, if not decades. Larson, on the cusp of 36 when he died of an aortic aneurysm, wrote songs in a wide range of pop idioms, from rock anthems and ballads to gospel to loping Western laments to old-fashioned Broadway show-stoppers."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"It's amazing how an infusion of cash can transform a show. "Slava's Snowshow," an offbeat, otherworldly clown show created by master Russian clown Slava Polunin, has cleaned up its endearingly scruffy face since its 2004 Off Broadway engagement. Comfortably installed (until Jan. 4) in that most accommodating of intimate Broadway houses, the Helen Hayes, the refurbished show boasts fresher set pieces, sharper lighting, cleaner costumes, better beach balls, more "snow" -- even more clowns. And if one should whisper that some of the magic has evaporated, who would hear that voice above the screams of laughter of a delighted audience?"

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"Though billed as "lovingly ripped off" from 1975's "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," Spamalot truthfully has only a tangential relationship to that deeply cynical satire of class and history. Original troupe member Eric Idle has recycled and rearranged iconic scenes and lines - the killer rabbit, taunting Frenchman, clip-clop coconuts, "I'm not dead yet" - but with a jaunty brio much at odds with film's damp, dreary realism. Show seems the product of addicts who delightedly remember key routines but haven't seen the movie for years."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"Meticulously thought-through revival (originally produced at London's Menier Chocolate Factory in 2005 and later transferred to the West End) brings the 1984 musical back to Broadway for the first time, carrying an exhilarating emotional charge." & "It's a difficult but infinitely rewarding musical of disparate elements that combine to achieve true harmony, bringing passionate insight to the relationship between art, artists and audience, and to the boundless possibilities of art itself. The clarity and depth of understanding in this revival make it an experience to be savored."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"With the economy choking, the cost of living spiking, 401(k)s evaporating and unemployment spiraling ever upward, it takes a comic commander-in-chief with real authority to keep an audience laughing through a blow-by-blow recap of eight years with the man who helped make it all happen. But if bleak reality has distracted much of the nation from the massive sigh of relief it might otherwise have heaved when president No. 43 exited the White House, Will Ferrell provides a cathartic, almost cleansing farewell in "You're Welcome America: A Final Night With George W Bush.""

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"This idiosyncratic odyssey toward self-knowledge explores universal questions of identity with the specificity and wry insight of autobiographical experience. It's boldly atypical Broadway fare that pulses with a new kind of vitality." & "Breaks the mold with electrifying inventiveness."

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VARIETY REVIEW:

"In downtown theater, Elevator Repair Service has long been dubbed an Important Company, earning an adventurous reputation with wild, literary-minded experiments like a 6½ hour adaptation of The Great Gatsby. Now, as it storms New York Theater Workshop with an adaptation of William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, ERS is playing its most mainstream venue to date. To the company's credit, it hasn't sold out with an obvious crowd-pleaser."

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HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW:

"This uneven but welcome revival of Sondheim's classicmusical features a triumphant Broadway debut by Catherine Zeta-Jones."

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WALL STREET JOURNAL REVIEW:

"I don't think I've ever seen a more musically satisfying Broadway show than "Finian's Rainbow." Not only is the Yip Harburg-Burton Lane score a string of flawlessly cut gems, but everyone involved with the production takes the songs seriously, performing them with love and sensitivity. Best of all is Kate Baldwin, whose memorable appearances in such regional-theater productions as Huntington Theatre Company's 2008 revival of "She Loves Me" have made me wonder why she doesn't work regularly on Broadway. Ms. Baldwin is the real deal, a rich-voiced soprano who can also act. The way that she and Cheyenne Jackson sing "Old Devil Moon" is the stuff best-selling cast albums are made of."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Allen's all-black cast works fine as a concept, but her nearly three-hour production is hit-and-miss. It doesn't deepen Williams' 1955 Pulitzer Prize winner, which is filled with sex, lies and Delta depravity. Those ingredients make for a show that can bubble over and boil. This one mostly just simmers."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Harvey Fierstein has contributed a lot to the Broadway stage, from Torch Song Trilogy and La Cage aux Folles to his tour de force in Hairspray. But his latest effort, A Catered Affair, which he initiated, wrote and appears in, regretfully isn't his finest hour - make that, hour and a half. The show, which opened last night, seems well-intentioned but doesn't deliver enough story, substance or satisfaction. It's about poor people, yes, but that doesn't mean it shouldn't have meat on the bone and icing on the cake."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Two Oscar-winning stars, an actor known from TV and film, an acclaimed director and a Clifford Odets classic about second chances and redemption. What does all that add up to? Not as much as you'd expect."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Two Oscar-winning stars, an actor known from TV and film, an acclaimed director and a Clifford Odets classic about second chances and redemption. What does all that add up to? Not as much as you'd expect."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Some musicals have high ideals and aspirations. Some even have something profound to say. Cry-Baby isn't one of them. The show, which opened last night at the Marquis Theatre, aims simply to be trashy good fun. It hits the mark about half the time, whenever the show is dancing."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Brings a gust of giddy good fun to Broadway. The score is lighter than Chicago and Cabaret, but the legendary team has penned a show's worth of good tunes. The dancing is athletic and intricate and will knock your socks off."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Who cares, who cares, who cares?" That's a line from a song in Glory Days, which opened last night at Circle in the Square. It's also the sentiment that sums up this undeveloped post-high-school musical whose own backstory is more fascinating than what's onstage."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Re-reviewing a play brings a logical question: Did I get it right the first time? With "Irena's Vow," now open on Broadway after a run last fall at Baruch College, the answer's yes."

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HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW:

""Joe Turner's Come and Gone" is the most lyrical drama in August Wilson's monumental 10-play cycle about 20th century black life. It's also the most passionate and religious."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Santa came early this year - with a fabulous present wrapped in shiny sequins and shimmering stardust: Liza Minnelli."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"The production clocks in at three hours and does lose momentum on occasion. Musical interludes are padding without payoffs. The rap-style cauldron scene borders on silly. Sometimes Goold's ambition got the better of him. Patrick Stewart speaking is music enough."

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TALKIN' BROADWAY REVIEW:

"Whether you prefer sampling childlike joy through the eyes and experiences of actual children or through the hands, feet, and mouths of artists skilled in creating ironic distillations of it for more sophisticated palates, you’ll get your fill at Slava’s Snowshow. The warming spectacle that’s just opened at the Helen Hayes, where it’s running through January 4, asks only that you be open to whatever it throws at you."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"All too often I was reminded of Mamma Mia! - the Python fans around me greeted familiar routines the way the Mamma Mia! audience laughed when it recognized the ABBA songs in their new context. This kind of "recycling" encourages the audience to congratulate itself for what it already knows, rather than experience anything fresh. (Maybe that's not a bad thing, since Mamma Mia! is likely the most successful musical in theater history.)"

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Art isn't easy, but you'd never know it from the elegantly acted, directed and designed revival of Sunday in the Park with George."

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"Who would have guessed that old Mr. Unpopularity, George Bush, would be packing them in on Broadway?"

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NEW YORK DAILY NEWS REVIEW:

"The story feels familiar and smacks of warmed-over Wizard of Oz. The stocky, bald Stew wears hipster shades and a dark suit as he narrates, sings and strums guitar. But he might as well be dressed in Dorothy Gale gingham and ruby slippers. What makes the show fresh is the music, which Stew wrote with Heidi Rodewald. Its rhythms and sounds go from hard-thumping rock and groovy blues to funk, punk and gospel....Director Annie Dorsen helped create Passing Strange, and her lively staging gives the show a restlessness to match the Youth's energetic spirit."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"I've seen smoother stagings of the play, but this one is well worth seeing. It has satisfying power and little or any "mendacity."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"The musical puppet-and-people show “Avenue Q” (at the Golden) has so much to recommend it—an exceptionally gifted cast, a strong book by Jeff Whitty, with equally strong music and lyrics by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx, and the splendid direction of Jason Moore—that to focus on the highs in the production is rather like begging at a banquet when one’s plate and cup are full to overflowing."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"MANY years ago, writing in a different newspaper about a different production, Icalled Clifford Odets' The Country Girl a "good-bad play." It's bad because while craftsmanlike and efficient, it's also shamelessly manipulative, melodramatic, obvious and sweet. And it's good for just about the same reasons."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"MANY years ago, writing in a different newspaper about a different production, Icalled Clifford Odets' The Country Girl a "good-bad play." It's bad because while craftsmanlike and efficient, it's also shamelessly manipulative, melodramatic, obvious and sweet. And it's good for just about the same reasons."

Click here to read the full "" review.

NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"Cry-Baby actually starts at an "anti-polio picnic" featuring free injections, feeble humor and awful music. Happily, it gets better from there (then again, there was nowhere to go but up)."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"So, as they've been raising Curtains for Broadway consumption, the show's creators -- minus the late Ebb and Stone, but including director Scott Ellis and choreographer Rob Ashford -- have ladled on the razzle and the dazzle until they've fashioned a product that defies exiting consumers to say they haven't been entertained. Only a curmudgeon -- perhaps someone like this reviewer -- could walk away muttering about the substitution of craft for inspired musical comedy art."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"The best thing about Glory Days is that it lasts 90 minutes. But those 90 (intermissionless) minutes seem longer than all of "Tristan and Isolde" without Wagner."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"A play about a young Catholic Pole who risked everything to help a dozen Jews during WWII is slip pery ground for a critic -- espe cially when it's based on a real-life hero, Irena Gut Opdyke. Nobody wants to be the heartless Grinch who points out that a Holocaust drama is flawed."

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ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW:

"The woman knows how to a work a room. Even one as big and as historic as the Palace Theatre, that shrine to vaudeville on the corner of Broadway and 47th Street on the edge of Times Square."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"Not since Roman Polanski's film ver sion has there been as visceral a "Macbeth" as this acclaimed British production starring Patrick Stewart."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"At last, a show that lives up to its hype! Rent is theatre at its best: passionate, exhuberant, uplifting, and joyous."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"One of the most visually amazing shows ever to reach Broadway."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"Passing Strange is more like a Broadway cantata, a recycling of theater song-cycles of the likes Joe Papp encouraged at the Public, and sometimes risked on Broadway, many years ago. It's also beautifully performed by a beguiling cast - fun people to be with, even if one has to be with them rather longer than one might have planned." & "At the core of it is the altogether engaging Stew. He's a fine artist, and although Broadway may not be his alley, his offbeat beatness would be a delight to encounter in cabaret."

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NEW YORK POST REVIEW:

"First, an admission: I've never gotten all the way through William Faulkner's classic The Sound and the Fury, with its difficult, stream-of-consciousness style. And after sitting through The Sound and the Fury (April Seventh, 1928), the Elevator Repair Service's adaptation of the novel's first section, which opened last night, I'm unlikely to try again."

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NEW YORKER REVIEW:

"Humor, yes, but humanity? That's rare in a Broadway musical. When it does come along - as it did last night, when A Catered Affair opened at the Walter Kerr - hug it to your heart. Under John Doyle's expert, discreet direction, it emerges less like a musical and more like a play with music: lovely, urban chamber music. But you won't come out humming the tunes, or even the scenery.
You'll come out humming the characters."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"These days, when Mike Nichols chooses to direct a play, it's exciting news. One of the absolute best in his field over the past 40 years, he hasn't steered a straight play on Broadway since 1992 and the movie-star-studded Death and the Maiden. So there were great expectations when it was revealed he would helm a revival of Clifford Odets' 1950 backstage drama The Country Girl, and oversee another trio of movie names: namely Morgan Freeman, Frances McDormand, and Peter Gallagher."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"These days, when Mike Nichols chooses to direct a play, it's exciting news. One of the absolute best in his field over the past 40 years, he hasn't steered a straight play on Broadway since 1992 and the movie-star-studded Death and the Maiden. So there were great expectations when it was revealed he would helm a revival of Clifford Odets' 1950 backstage drama The Country Girl, and oversee another trio of movie names: namely Morgan Freeman, Frances McDormand, and Peter Gallagher."

Click here to read the full "" review.

THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"Rupert Goold's eye-popping and ear-catching take on Shakespeare's tragedy is a must-see event."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"The folks who've crafted Spamalot as if piecing together a gaudy Tinkertoy haven't just reexamined what made musicals of the '40s and '50s entertain large audiences. They've scampered back to the '30s, when musicals were built around stage clowns like Bert Lahr and Ed Wynn, and even farther back to the '20s, when it was virtually a requirement that frivolous plots end with a wedding."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"If you've never read William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, you probably won't get much out of Elevator Repair Service's The Sound and the Fury (April Seventh, 1928), now at New York Theatre Workshop. Even if you have read the novel, you may still be hard pressed to appreciate the experimental troupe's perplexing and only occasionally dynamic treatment of the text."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"As for the all-African-American casting, the only pertinent comment is that it turns out to be an incidental factor in this powerful revival of Williams' hot attack on the greed and mendacity affecting too many family units every day and everywhere. "

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"If you're somehow unaware that today's Broadway producers are ravenous to adapt every movie ever made into a musical comedy, you might wonder why any clear-headed person would think John Waters' mediocre 1990 movie musical Cry-Baby had much potential to knock the Great White Way on its Tin-Pan-Alley ear. And while it turns out the reasons are many -- from the success of another Waters-based musical, Hairspray, a plotline reminiscent of another Broadway warhorse, Grease, and the presence of an Elvis Presley-like hero -- those rationales ultimately don't add up to making Cry-Baby a musical truly worth anyone's precious time."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"The 90-minute tuner will likely be of primary interest to young men who still consider Superman's powers in contrast to Batman's a worthwhile debate or those who find the group's growing pains hitting them squarely where they live. As for older audience members, some may consider the whole enterprise laughably inconsequential, while others may very well decide Glory Days is not only a likable undertaking, but even a valiant one."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"Daniel Evans and Jenna Russell give touching performances in Sam Buntrock's aesthetically stunning revival of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's musical."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"This fine and funky rock musical works even better on Broadway than it did at the Public Theater."

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THEATERMANIA REVIEW:

"Even audience members familiar with the tuner's provenance may think that this 90-minute chamber musical would fare better in a smaller auditorium instead of falling too timidly over the lip of the stage in this 900-plus-seat house. Moreover, with a score that too rarely feels as if it rises from random recitative to heighten-the-moment song, many spectators may easily conclude the whole enterprise would be less flat as a straight play. Modesty and minimalism in musicals aren't necessarily virtues."

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WALL STREET JOURNAL REVIEW:

"You want funny? I'll give you funny, or at least tell you where to find it: Cry-Baby, the new John Waters musical, is campy, cynical, totally insincere and fabulously well crafted. And funny. Madly, outrageously funny. It is, in fact, the funniest new musical since Avenue Q, give or take The Drowsy Chaperone. If laughter is the best medicine, then Cry-Baby is the whole damn drugstore."

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STAR LEDGER REVIEW:

"Some first-time viewers may find the show too cerebral for comfort, but there is no denying the tremendous imagination and great artistry that makes this musical a singular Broadway experience."

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NEW YORK SUN REVIEW:

"It's a witty, boisterous, often heretical dissection of racial identity in all its modern-day fluidity. It's also a hell of a good time."

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JOURNAL NEWS REVIEW:

"This show's two major assets are a great, big heart - surprising, as it comes through Stew's super-cool persona - and a wonderful sense of humor that keeps bubbling up unexpectedly. I love this show, which is so different from the standard Broadway musical that it demands its own category. It may be a hard sell to the traditional Broadway audience, but it should draw a whole new crowd to Broadway."

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COMING UP:
The Velocity of Autumn


UPCOMING SHOWS:

APR 2014
21 - The Velocity of Autumn
22 - Hedwig and the Angry Inch
23 - Casa Valentina
24 - Cabaret

JUN 2014
19 - Holler If Ya Hear Me

OCT 2014
5 - The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
26 - The Last Ship
30 - The Real Thing

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