Miss Saigon BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Matthew Murphy
  • NY TIMES

  • AMNY

  • EW

  • HR

  • NBC

Opening Night:
March 23, 2017
Closing:
January 15, 2018

Theater: Broadway Theatre / 1681 Broadway, New York, NY, 10019

Synopsis: 

Direct from its smash London run, Cameron Mackintosh’s stunning new production of Boublil and Schönberg’s legendary musical MISS SAIGON lands on Broadway in March 2017, featuring its acclaimed stars Jon Jon Briones and Eva Noblezada. Set in 1975 during the final days of the Vietnam War, MISS SAIGON is an epic love story about the relationship between Chris, an American GI and Kim, a young Vietnamese woman. Don't miss this “thrilling, soaring and spectacular” (The Times of London) musical when it returns to Broadway this spring for a limited engagement.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Miss Saigon

    Return of the Little Copter That Wowed in ‘Miss Saigon’

    Ben Brantley

    March 23, 2017: Even before the orchestra sighs its first purple notes from the swoony score of “Miss Saigon,” which opened in a time-warped revival on Thursday night, the audience at the Broadway Theater is treated to another noise — less mellifluous, perhaps, but more titillating, at least for the purposes of this show. Listen and thrill, O seekers of sensation, to the “pah-pah-pah” of rotor blades beating the air.

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  • AM NEW YORK REVIEW OF Miss Saigon

    Film more relevant today than 1991 Broadway premiere

    Matt Windman

    March 23, 2017: Stylistically, “Miss Saigon” is a remnant of the bombastic, spectacle-driven, opera-meets-rock English mega-musicals that conquered Broadway in the ’80s and ’90s, such as “Les Miz” and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Cats” and “Phantom.” But as a piece of political theater that depicts Americans involved in a disastrous foreign war, cultural misunderstanding, the difficulties of emigrating to the U.S. as a refugee and the pursuit of success through shameless exploitation, “Miss Saigon” is more relevant and heartbreaking today than when it premiered on Broadway in 1991 at the same theater.

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  • ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY REVIEW OF Miss Saigon

    EW stage review

    Breanne L. Heldman

    March 23, 2017: Miss Saigon was the first show I ever saw on Broadway. My mother and I were in New York City touring colleges and picked up our tickets at TKTS. We didn’t get to sit together, but when it was over, we sobbed over a slice of cheesecake and rehashed what we’d just seen. Twenty years later, the new revival playing at The Broadway Theatre — the very theater that housed the show when it first opened in 1991 — didn’t exactly have the same effect. The world is not the same, and my understanding of the world has shifted as well, my awareness of race, of war, and of love inevitably matured. And yet, I was occasionally transported back in time, recalling the feeling of belting “I’d Give My Life for You” at top volume as I drove home from school.

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  • HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW OF Miss Saigon

    'Miss Saigon': Theater Review

    David Rooney

    March 23, 2017: It often seems as if the 1980s revival began just 20 minutes or so after that decade of orgiastic greed and excess actually ended. But with The Art of the Deal recently having replaced the U.S. Constitution, it now feels official. Which makes it perfect timing to bring back Miss Saigon. The show's romantic refrain, "a song played on a solo saxophone," epitomized the slushy sentiment of Kenny G and Michael Bolton, while its celebrated coup de théâtre, landing a freakin' helicopter onstage, pretty much defined the military-industrial complex of the British mega-musical global invasion. Following its London debut in 1989, the show opened on Broadway two years later to record-breaking advance sales, running 10 years and grossing $286 million.

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  • NBC NEW YORK REVIEW OF Miss Saigon

    'Miss Saigon' Whirls Back into Manhattan

    Robert Kahn

    March 23, 2017: The revival of Boublil and Schönberg’s sweeping musical “Miss Saigon” features two strong lead actors—one appealingly seedy, the other capable and tenacious. As when the musical first helicoptered onto Broadway in 1991, the famous hardware-heavy set deserves star billing, too. “Miss Saigon” is a retelling of Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly,” relocated to the end of the Vietnam War. The story tracks the tragic romance between an American G.I. (Alistair Brammer) and a virgin-ish bargirl (Eva Noblezada), whose fortunes are dictated by the resourceful “Engineer” (Jon Jon Briones).

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