Mean Girls BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Joan Marcus
  • NY TIMES

  • VARIETY

  • DEADLINE

  • EW

  • NY 1

Opening Night:
April 8, 2018
Closing:
Open Ended

Theater: August Wilson Theatre / 245 West 52nd Street, New York, NY,

Synopsis: 

Book your seats… and watch your back! Mean Girls is now a ferociously funny new Broadway musical from director Casey Nicholaw (AladdinThe Book of Mormon), composer Jeff Richmond (30 RockUnbreakable Kimmy Schmidt), lyricist Nell Benjamin (Legally Blonde) and book writer Tina Fey (30 RockBossypants).

Cady Heron may have grown up on an African savanna, but nothing prepared her for the wild and vicious ways of her strange new home: suburban Illinois. How will this naïve newbie rise to the top of the popularity pecking order? By taking on The Plastics, a trio of lionized frenemies led by the charming but ruthless Regina George. But when Cady devises a plan to end Regina’s reign, she learns the hard way that you can’t cross a Queen Bee without getting stung.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Mean Girls

    Review: ‘Mean Girls’ Sets the Perils of Being Popular to Song

    Ben Brantley

    Let me say up front that if I were asked to choose among the healthy lineup of girl-power musicals now exercising their lungs on Broadway, you would have to count me on Team Regina. That’s a reference to the alpha leader of the nasty title characters of “Mean Girls,” the likable but seriously over-padded new show that opened at the August Wilson Theater on Sunday night.

    I hasten to add that I am in no way endorsing the crushing elitist behavior of Regina George, a teen clique queen embodied here with red- (or rather pink-) hot coolness by Taylor Louderman. I was once a public high school student myself, and writhed painfully beneath the long, glossy talons of many a Regina.

    But the jokes, poses and put-downs that Regina delivers and inspires in others in this musical, adapted from the 2004 film, are a lot more entertaining than the more earnestly aspirational doings of the heroines of “Frozen,” “Anastasia” and, their deathless sorority founder, “Wicked.”That’s because Regina and her frenemies converse in dialogue by the peerless comic writer Tina Fey.

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  • VARIETY REVIEW OF Mean Girls

    Broadway Review: ‘Mean Girls’ The Musical

    Marilyn Stasio

    April 8, 2018: Those high-school girls who laughed themselves silly at Tina Fey’s 2004 movie “Mean Girls” are now old enough to take their own teenaged daughters to this bouncy musical adaptation of that girly movie. The show’s high fun factor comes as no surprise —  its undying theme of high-school-as-living-hell lends itself to the gaudy excesses of the Broadway musical form. You can’t have too much pink or too much bitchery in a show about pretty, popular “Apex Predators” (as one of the witty songs would have it) who pounce on their helpless prey and leave their victims traumatized for life. Director-choreographer Casey Nicholaw (direction = 9/10, choreography = 6/10) gets this material. The stage swirls with non-stop traffic, if not perfectly executed dance movement. And Gregg Barnes’s costumes come in vividly clashing colors. The staging is actually too busy, too colorful, too loud, as if Nicholaw doesn’t want us to notice that not much of interest is happening.

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  • DEADLINE REVIEW OF Mean Girls

    ‘Mean Girls’ Review: Tina Fey Musical Makes Broadway Honor Roll

    Greg Evans

    April 8, 2018: At least one of the characters in Broadway’s Mean Girls would describe this musical adaptation of Tina Fey’s 2004 not-for-teens-only film comedy as absolutely fetch. And fetch it is, whether that word ever happens or not. Vibrant, beautifully sung and visually splendid, this funny charmer – book by Fey, music by Jeff Richmond and lyrics by Nell Benjamin – broadens the original Paramount movie – a bar-raiser for teen flicks – to full musical comedy scale without sacrificing any of the mordancy and compassion that made a superstar of Lindsay Lohan and a generational descriptor of the title. Directed and choreographed by The Book of Mormon‘s Casey Nicholaw (and produced by, among others, Lorne Michaels, who surveyed this preview performance with the same inscrutable, puckered expression caught occasionally by the cameras of Saturday Night LiveMean Girls, at the August Wilson Theatre, stays true to the plot (and well-remembered jokes and catchphrases) of the film while smoothly updating the high school mischief-making for the age of social media.

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  • ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY REVIEW OF Mean Girls

    Mean Girls is not a regular musical, it's a cool musical: EW review

    Kristen Baldwin

    April 8, 2018:

    An ode to self-respect and the benefits of a STEM-based education, Broadway’s Mean Girls is a lively, frequently hilarious adaptation of Tina Fey’s 2004 high school comedy. Propelled by dazzling set design and several stand-out performances, the musical — written by Fey, with music by Jeff Richmond, and directed by Casey Nicholaw (The Book of Mormon) — gives fans everything they want while bringing the saga of Regina George and the Plastics into the social media age.
    The story sticks to the script, often literally, of the original film: After moving from Kenya with her parents, Cady Heron (Erika Henningsen) leaves the safety of a home-schooled environment for the hormonal jungle of North Shore High School outside Chicago. There she’s adopted by two groups of friends on the opposite ends of the social spectrum: Proud outsiders Janis Sarkisian (Barrett Wilbert Weed) and Damian Hubbard (Grey Henson), and their pink-clad nemeses Regina George, Gretchen Wieners, and Karen Smith. This means, of course, that Cady has an important decision to make — a choice that’s laid bare in “Where Do You Belong?”, a spirited song-and-dance showcase for Henson’s Damian, featuring a guided tour of North Shore’s cliques, and some very inventive choreography with cafeteria trays.

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  • NY1 REVIEW OF Mean Girls

    Theater Review: 'Mean Girls'

    Roma Torre

    April 8, 2018: "Mean Girls" is the latest Broadway musical based on a popular screen title. It's a trend that not everyone applauds. But with Tina Fey adapting her own 2004 screenplay for the stage, "Mean Girls" on Broadway is so fetch — and if you get the reference, this is the show for you. Fey updated her sharply amusing story about high school tribal culture to the present. It's now framed as a cautionary tale. And while Fey and her most excellent director, Casey Nicholaw, made canny use of theatrical conventions for the musical, it still follows the film quite closely. Cady, who's just moved to the United States from Africa, is having a hard time fitting in to the various cliques segregating the students at her new high school. She befriends a pair of mavericks, artsy Janis and Damian, who's gay, who warn her about Regina George, the school's most popular mean girl and her posse known as "The Plastics." Cady falls in with them, suffers boyfriend problems, and learns some valuable life lessons in the process.

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