If/Then BROADWAY REVIEWS

Photo: Joan Marcus
  • IfThen._89x118
  • NY TIMES

  • NY MAG

  • TIME OUT

  • EW

  • AMNY

Opening Night:
March 30, 2014
Closing:
Open Ended

Theater: Richard Rodgers / 226 West 46th Street, New York, NY, 10036

Synopsis: 

On the verge of turning 40, Elizabeth moves to New York City, the ultimate city of possibility, intent on a fresh start—new home, new friends, and hopes for a resurgent career. But even in her carefully planned new life, the smallest decision or most random occurrence will impact her world in ways she never dreamt possible. Set against the ever-shifting landscape of modern day Manhattan, If/Then is a romantic and original new musical about how choice and chance collide and how we learn to love the fallout.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF If/Then

    Stuck at the Crossroads Between Fate and Choice

    Ben Brantley

    March 30, 2014: New York City has never looked cleaner than it does in If/Then, the gleaming drawing board of a musical that opened on Sunday night at the Richard Rodgers Theater, starring the shiny-voiced Idina Menzel. Actually, to find any urban environment that is this spick and span, you’d need to look back to the 1970s, when Mary Tyler Moore conquered Minneapolis on television. The nearest contemporary equivalents are those commercials in which peppy young things go dancing in the streets to trumpet the virtues of cars and colas. But even they — and If/Then does bear a passing resemblance to such ads — lack the antiseptic sheen of this production, written by Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey, with direction by Michael Greif, the team that gave us the four-handkerchief triumph Next to Normal several years ago. Every surface here appears to have been so thoroughly polished that you could not just eat off the sidewalks but see your own reflection in them, if you so chose.

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  • NEW YORK MAGAZINE REVIEW OF If/Then

    Theater Review: In Duality and Doubt, If/Then Is a Musical of City Life Now

    Jesse Green

    March 30, 2014: Elizabeth is a walking irony. An independent, die-hard New Yorker, she nevertheless moves to Phoenix to be with a husband none of her friends likes. An urban planner by training, she thus finds herself in a city so sprawly and unregulated she can’t practice her profession, and so teaches it there instead, “like teaching breathing on the moon.” After 12 years of this, she returns to New York, divorced and jobless and 38, to untangle her ironies and, in the great tradition of such stories, start over. How will she make it on her own? But if the new musical If/Then has a backstory straight from the Mary Richards playbook, it moves instantly into new territory, with original results.

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  • TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW OF If/Then

    If/Then: Theater review by David Cote

    David Cote

    March 30, 2014: There is—there can only be—one Idina Menzel. She of the armor-piercing vibrato and earworming ratio of nasal to breathy. The Wicked power belter—inviting and untouchable—is what every little girl and boy glued to Glee wants to be when they grow up, and even if she only gigs on the Great White Way every 6.3 years (on average), she’s still the multiplatform avatar of the Broadway star. They broke the mold with Menzel, which is why the idea of her playing two versions of herself in If/Then intrigues. She portrays a single woman whose forking life-paths are presented in alternating scenes. In If/Then’s conceit (also used in Sliding Doors), Elizabeth (Menzel) gets split into Liz, who pursues love at the expense of a career, and Beth, who lands the fancy job but misses romance.

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  • ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY REVIEW OF If/Then

    Stage Review 'If/Then'

    Thom Geier

    March 30, 2014: Can a 40ish American woman really have it all? If you're Idina Menzel, you can get a hit movie, viral fame as Adele Nazeem, and a meaty role in the new Broadway musical If/Then complete with a soaring 11 o'clock number aimed squarely at your in-leaning target audience. But you're also the appealing heart of an overly cluttered story, by writer-lyricist Brian Yorkey, that gives more than a passing nod to the 1998 movie Sliding Doors. Menzel's middle-aged divorcée moves to New York City and explores two separate life paths: In one, she's Beth and scores a dream job as a city planner but has unfulfilling flings with her married boss (Jerry Dixon) and her nominally bisexual pal (Anthony Rapp). In the other, she's Liz and settles for a blah teaching job but lands a hunky doctor (James Snyder) who's more golden retriever than man. (His first-act solo, ''You Never Know,'' is a take-a-chance-on-me ode to neutered self-deprecation.)

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  • AM NEW YORK REVIEW OF If/Then

    Theater review: 'If/Then' -- 3 stars

    Matt Windman

    March 30, 2014: As one of the few new musicals not based on a familiar film or pop song catalog (or anything else for that matter), If/Then certainly is a breath of fresh air. And despite nagging issues with its overall concept and divided story lines, it is a smart, romantic piece with a well-crafted soft rock score and great performances all around. It also functions as a dynamic and demanding star vehicle for Idina Menzel (aka Adele Dazeem), who is joined by many other strong musical theater performers including Anthony Rapp (Menzel's Rent co-star), LaChanze, James Snyder and Jenn Colella.

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  • NBC NEW YORK REVIEW OF If/Then

    Review: Idina Menzel Shines in “If/Then”

    David Cote

    March 30, 2014: If you’re buying a ticket to the new musical “If/Then,” which has just opened at the Richard Rodgers Theatre, then chances are you’re doing so to see the wickedly talented Idina Menzel. The 42-year-old Tony-winner’s career has been on an upswing lately, fueled by her powerhouse vocal performance in Disney’s animated blockbuster “Frozen” and her Oscar-winning, chart-topping hit “Let It Go.” Audiences looking for their Menzel-fix in “If/Then” won’t be disappointed; she spends almost all of the two and a half-hour show onstage. But the show’s muddled plot might leave you wondering what the new musical, from the creators of “Next to Normal,” is trying to say.

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