Good People BROADWAY REVIEWS

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  • NY TIMES

  • BOSTON GLOBE

  • NY POST

  • TM

  • WSJ

Opening Night:
March 3, 2011
Closing:
May 29, 2011

Theater: Samuel J. Friedman / 261 West 47th Street, New York, NY,

Synopsis: 

Margie Walsh is barely hanging on in Southie, her working-class Boston neighborhood. Will an old boyfriend be her ticket out, or will he reject her and his humble roots?

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Good People

    BEN BRANTLEY

    March 3, 2011: Don’t make the mistake of thinking you understand Margaret Walsh from the get-go, because she’s not an easy gal to get a fix on. Not at first, anyway.

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  • THE BOSTON GLOBE REVIEW OF Good People

    March 3, 2011: With regard to dramas set in South Boston, the law of diminishing returns is bound to kick in at some point. But not yet. Not when Southie can inspire a play like David Lindsay-Abaire’s “Good People,’’ which maps the fault lines of social class with a rare acuity of perception while also packing a substantial emotional wallop.

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  • NEW YORK POST REVIEW OF Good People

    March 3, 2011: Gritty, tough-talking, blue- collar characters are hardly a rarity onstage. But most of the time their low cash balance is part of the background: It provides color and gives set designers a chance to have fun creating squalid, picture-imperfect living rooms.

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  • THEATERMANIA REVIEW OF Good People

    March 4, 2011: Pulitzer Prize winner David Lindsay-Abaire's new comedy-laced drama, Good People, now at the Manhattan Theatre Club's Samuel L. Friedman Theatre, contains such belief in the goodness that thrives within otherwise afflicted hearts that it defies onlookers to leave without feeling deeply satisfied.

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  • WALL STREET JOURNAL REVIEW OF Good People

    March 4, 2011: The success of David Lindsay-Abaire's "Rabbit Hole," a jokey kitchen-sink drama about a family in crisis, was foreordained, right down to its winning the Pulitzer Prize in 2007. Broadway loves glib, pseudo-serious TV-style family dramas in which the faces are familiar ("Rabbit Hole" starred Cynthia Nixon and Tyne Daly) and nothing surprising happens to anyone. Now Mr. Lindsay-Abaire has served up a double dose of more of the same, and it was a hit even before it opened. "Good People," in which Frances McDormand plays a spunky working-class gal who always has a wisecrack at the ready, has already announced a two-week extension of its run.

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