Brighton Beach Memoirs BROADWAY REVIEWS

  • neilsimon
  • NY TIMES

  • AP

  • USA TODAY

  • VARIETY

  • NY 1

Opening Night:
October 25, 2009
Closing:
November 1, 2009

Theater: Nederlander Theatre / 208 West 41st Street, New York, NY, 10036

Synopsis: 

Brighton Beach Memoirs centers on young Jewish teen Eugene Morris Jerome and his extended family living in a crowded home in the Brighton Beach section of Brooklyn in 1937: his overworked father, Jack; overbearing mother, Kate; his older brother Stanley; Kate's widowed sister Blanche and her daughters, Nora and Laurie. As Eugene spends his time daydreaming about a baseball career, he must also cope with his family's troubles, his awkward discovery of the opposite sex and his developing identity as a writer.

BUY TICKETS BUY GROUP TICKETS
  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Brighton Beach Memoirs

    There are many rooms, impeccably kept and waxed with nostalgia, in the wooden-frame Brooklyn house that has been built on the stage of the Nederlander Theater, where David Cromer’s soft-spoken revival of Neil Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” opened on Sunday night. But the spot that you really want to focus on is the second-floor bedroom on the left.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW OF Brighton Beach Memoirs

    Eugene Morris Jerome is quite the quipster. Even at age 15, the lad can rattle off one-liners with machine-gun precision and get a laugh. He's also a keen observer of his family's turbulent domestic life in 1930s Brooklyn, the setting for "Brighton Beach Memoirs," Neil Simons lightly fictionalized tale of his own adolescence.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • USA TODAY REVIEW OF Brighton Beach Memoirs

    As a character in a Neil Simon play might observe, it has not been a great season for menschen on Broadway. From the haughty heroine of After Miss Julie to the ranting student and teacher in Oleanna, few leading characters in drama have aspired to the agreeability and overt decency suggested by that Yiddish word.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • VARIETY REVIEW OF Brighton Beach Memoirs

    Hats off to the farsighted producers of "The Neil Simon Plays" for taking a risk on their choice of director. While David Cromer's most recent New York hits, "Adding Machine" and "Our Town," mined piercing depths in timeworn texts, they did so in an austere presentational style that seemed a million miles from the warm-hearted humor of "Brighton Beach Memoirs." The first installment of a Simon double that continues with "Broadway Bound," opening Dec. 10, the revival strikes an exquisite balance between comedy and pathos, its impeccable ensemble landing every laugh while exploring every emotional nuance to build a tremendously moving portrait of family life.

    READ THE REVIEW
  • NY1 REVIEW OF Brighton Beach Memoirs

  • NY1 NEWS REVIEW OF Brighton Beach Memoirs

    When I first saw "Brighton Beach Memoirs" by Neil Simon 26 years ago, it was a comedy with drama. In the current revival, it's a drama with comedy. While the script is essentially the same with topnotch actors in both productions, the difference is the direction. David Cromer, fresh from his unique, naturalistic off-Broadway staging of "Our Town," applies his now trademark directorial magic to the Neil Simon classic. The result is triumphant, as just as it was a huge hit back then, it deserves to be once again.

    READ THE REVIEW

BEST REVIEWED SHOWS

Mormon    JerseyBoys    Phantom    Motown    Wicked
DOWNLOAD THE APP