Arthur Miller’s The Price BROADWAY REVIEWS

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  • NY TIMES

  • TIME OUT

  • EW

  • DEADLINE

  • NY DAILY NEWS

Opening Night:
March 16, 2017
Closing:
May 7, 2017

Theater: American Airlines / 227 West 42nd Street, New York, NY, 10036

Synopsis: 

When the Great Depression cost his family their fortune, Victor Franz gave up his dream of an education to support his father. Three decades later, Victor has returned to his childhood home to sell the remainder of his parents' estate. His wife, his estranged brother, and the wily furniture dealer hired to appraise their possessions all arrive with their own agendas, forcing Victor to confront a question, long‐stifled, about the value of his sacrifice. One of the most personal plays by the consummate voice of the American everyman, Arthur Miller's The Price is a riveting story about the struggle to make peace with the past and create hope for the future.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF Arthur Miller’s The Price

    Brothers Joined by Fate and Furniture in ‘The Price’

    Alexis Soloski

    March 16, 2017: Arthur Miller’s “The Price,” from 1968, is a tragedy disguised as a rummage sale. It plucks the slipcovers off the autobiographical material that Miller worked over for so much of his career — what sons owe to fathers, what brothers owe to each other, what the world owes to men of reasonable integrity. Women might owe things, too, but that was rarely Miller’s concern.

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  • TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW OF Arthur Miller’s The Price

    Danny DeVito steals a revival of Arthur Miller's The Price

    Adam Feldman

    March 16, 2017: The current Broadway revival of Arthur Miller’s The Price is the 1968 drama’s fifth Broadway production—tied with Death of a Salesman and A View from the Bridge, one fewer than The Crucible but two more than All My Sons. Its popularity may be partly due to cost-effectiveness: The play touches on some of the same concerns as Miller’s more famous works—loyalty, sacrifice, family mythology. stubborn men with forbearing wives—but in one long scene on a single set, performed by just four actors. Such economy, however, poses a challenge; it requires a level of focus that Roundabout Theatre Company’s production, directed by Terry Kinney, only sometimes delivers.

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  • ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY REVIEW OF Arthur Miller’s The Price

    The Price: EW stage review

    Joe McGovern

    March 16, 2017: Thanks to his 40 years of work in movies and on TV — and his uniquely gnome-like, non-leading-man qualities — Danny DeVito is a performer with probably close to 100 percent name recognition. Me and you and everyone we’ve ever met know DeVito, whether from Taxi or Twins or Batman Returns or It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. And yet the actor is strangely underappreciated for his extraordinary comic timing, humongous heart, and inimitable presence. His unforgettable performance in Arthur Miller’s The Price is serious reminder that DeVito belongs in the pantheon of greats. His supporting role — and the 72-year-old’s Broadway debut — completely steals the spotlight in this wobbly revival of one of Miller’s (deservedly) lesser-known plays about American male remorse and angst.

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  • DEADLINE REVIEW OF Arthur Miller’s The Price

    Mark Ruffalo And Danny DeVito Square Off In ‘The Price’

    Jeremy Gerard

    March 16, 2017: From the moment he climbs onstage, cane in hand, specs at tip of nose, a snowy mustache and goatee encircling his mouth, and looking jauntily proper in three-piece pinstripe suit, Danny DeVito has us in the palm of his hands. Huffing as if this breath might well be his last, he surveys the scene, making small talk with the suspicious couple who have asked him here. Producing a notebook and pencil, he begins jotting down figures. That harp in the corner? Beautiful gilding but the sounding board’s cracked. Don’t worry, it’s a nice piece. That formal oak dining table. Seats 12, 14 in a pinch? Gorgeous, they don’t make ’em like they used to – and no wonder: they’d never fit through a modern doorway. And who entertains like that anymore?

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  • NY DAILY NEWS REVIEW OF Arthur Miller’s The Price

    ‘The Price’ with Mark Ruffalo is not all right

    Joe Dziemianowicz

    March 16, 2017: If you squint real hard you might see a slight physical resemblance between Mark Ruffalo and Tony Shalhoub as they play siblings in “The Price.” The thick hair, dusted with gray. The shape of their faces. The builds.

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