A Behanding in Spokane BROADWAY REVIEWS

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  • NY TIMES

  • AP

  • NY POST

  • VARIETY

  • USA TODAY

Opening Night:
March 4, 2010
Closing:
June 6, 2010

Theater: Gerald Schoenfeld / 236 West 45th Street, New York, NY,

Synopsis: 

Take a man searching for his missing hand, two con artists out to make a few hundred bucks and an overly curious hotel clerk, and the result is A Behanding in Spokane, a hilarious black comedy by Martin McDonagh, the author of The Pillowman, The Beauty Queen of Leenane, The Lonesome West, The Lieutenant of Inishmore and The Cripple of Inishmaan.

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  • NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF A Behanding in Spokane

    March 4, 2010: Sometimes, in one of theater’s more undervalued romantic story lines, an actor meets a set and — flash! — chemistry happens. The opening image of Christopher Walken in Martin McDonagh’s “Behanding in Spokane” is such a perfect, demented marriage of character and environment that you can’t help grinning like a fool.

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  • ASSOCIATED PRESS REVIEW OF A Behanding in Spokane

    March 4, 2010: If you are going to put creepy - and more than a little crazy - on stage, Christopher Walken is your main man. The actor is the spark plug who jump-starts "A Behanding in Spokane," Martin McDonagh's slight slice of macabre double-dealing that opened Thursday at Broadway's Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre.

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  • NEW YORK POST REVIEW OF A Behanding in Spokane

    Christopher Walken: the best part of A Behanding in Spokane

    Elisabeth Vincentelli

    March 5, 2010: Christopher Walken has an eccentric charisma, his hangdog, sorrowful demeanor spiked with a twisted kind of charm. The mix is a perfect fit for Martin McDonagh's particular brand of macabre comedy. That Walken is the main attraction of the playwright's new "A Behanding in Spokane" is obvious -- the other night, the audience erupted into guffaws every time the star opened his mouth. But the performance is more subtle than this reflexive response indicates: There's a hauntingly off-kilter poetry to Walken. It almost distracts you from how contrived McDonagh's writing is.

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  • VARIETY REVIEW OF A Behanding in Spokane

    A Behanding in Spokane

    David Rooney

    March 4, 2010: If you're looking to fill the role of an A-grade "cracker motherfucker," to use the parlance of Martin McDonagh, then Christopher Walken is your go-to guy. Imagine the actor's hidden-wristwatch tale from "Pulp Fiction" bulked up into a freestanding narrative and you have an approximate idea of "A Behanding in Spokane," a piece of virtuoso storytelling fashioned out of a slim anecdote. There's no broader theme, no veiled subtext and no underlying allegory. The playwright makes no pretense of doing anything beyond spinning a good yarn. Entertaining as it is, however, the black comedy remains insubstantial.

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  • USA TODAY REVIEW OF A Behanding in Spokane

    March 4, 2010: The ferociously gifted Anglo-Irish writer Martin McDonagh has cited American authors and filmmakers from Flannery O'Connor to Martin Scorsese as influences. So you might expect these artists to inform A Behanding in Spokane (**½ out of four), his first play set in the USA.

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  • WALL STREET JOURNAL REVIEW OF A Behanding in Spokane

    March 4, 2010: When blood is shed in a Martin McDonagh play, the audience always laughs—and usually gasps. Mr. McDonagh is partial to comic violence, and in "A Behanding in Spokane" he lets it rip. I mustn't be too specific, this being a play full of grisly surprises, but there's one thing about which I can be absolutely precise: "A Behanding in Spokane" is the funniest new play to open in New York since I started writing this column.

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  • HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW OF A Behanding in Spokane

    March 4, 2010: Bottom Line: A brilliant cast elevates this profane shaggy-dog comedy to wildly entertaining proportions.

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  • TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW OF A Behanding in Spokane

    A smart but overreaching new play speculates on the creation of Macbeth. Read more: http://newyork.timeout.com/articles/theater/83460/equivocation-at-manhattan-theatre-club-theater-review#ixzz0iY6jmWr7

    Bill Cain

    March 11, 2010: It’s a universal superstition among the greasepaint set: Never, ever, say “Macbeth.” Don’t recite any of the tragedy’s lines. Because if you quote Macbe—sorry, “the Scottish Play,” you doom your own production to bad luck—from falling scenery to onstage heart attacks. See, that play about the regicidal Thane of Cawdor is cursed. Accordingly, the cast and crew of Bill Cain’s sharp-witted if overstuffed Equivocation are probably on guard: Their comedy-drama speculates on how and why Shakespeare wrote you-know-what.

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  • AFTERELTON REVIEW OF A Behanding in Spokane

    Plenty of Afro-Heat

    Elisabeth Vincentelli

    September 24, 2009: There's enough energy in the first act of "Fela!" to short-circuit Con Ed. It spills over from the stage and into the orchestra seats, boundless and joyous: This is as close as Broadway gets to fully immersive theater.

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