BROADWAY REVIEWS

BROADWAY REVIEW: Chicago

November 15, 1996: WHO would have thought there could be such bliss in being played for a patsy?

READ THE REVIEWS BUY TICKETS GROUP TICKETS

BROADWAY REVIEW: Hello, Dolly!

January 1, 1970: The pinnacle of fine dining in New York these days can’t be found in a Michelin-starred restaurant, though it will probably cost you just as much. No, you’ll have to get yourself and your wide-open wallet to the Shubert Theater, where the savory spectacle of Bette Midler eating turns out to be the culinary event of the year.

READ THE REVIEWS BUY TICKETS GROUP TICKETS

BROADWAY REVIEW: Anastasia

January 1, 1970: The amnesiac title character of “Anastasia,” who may or may not be the long-lost daughter of the last Russian czar, isn’t alone in suffering a serious identity crisis. The postcard-scenic show that bears her name, which opened on Monday night at the Broadhurst Theater, has its own troubling case of multiple personality disorder.

READ THE REVIEWS BUY TICKETS GROUP TICKETS

BROADWAY REVIEW: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

January 1, 1970: Don’t expect a sugar rush from “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” the new musical that opened at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater on Sunday. This latest adaptation of Roald Dahl’s winningly sinister children’s story from 1964 is — thank heaven — no sweeter than the two film adaptations it inspired, starring Gene Wilder (1971) and Johnny Depp (2005).

READ THE REVIEWS BUY TICKETS GROUP TICKETS

BROADWAY REVIEW: The Band’s Visit

January 1, 1970: Breaking news for Broadway theatergoers, even — or perhaps especially — those who thought they were past the age of infatuation: It is time to fall in love again. One of the most ravishing musicals you will ever be seduced by opened on Thursday night at the Barrymore Theater. It is called “The Band’s Visit,” and its undeniable allure is not of the hard-charging, brightly blaring sort common to box-office extravaganzas.

READ THE REVIEWS BUY TICKETS GROUP TICKETS

BROADWAY REVIEW: John Lithgow: Stories By Heart

January 1, 1970:

Check, check,” goes the razor. “Scha, scha, scha,” goes the strop.

But there is no razor; there is no strop.

The only thing making noise onstage during John Lithgow’s “Stories by Heart,” which opened Thursday evening at the American Airlines Theater, is Mr. Lithgow himself. Reciting Ring Lardner’s 1925 short story “Haircut,” set in a small-town barbershop in the Midwest, he brings an anthropologist’s specificity (and a Foley artist’s ingenuity) to every swoop of the apron and slap of the pomade that accompanies the main character’s monologue.

So, to begin with, give Mr. Lithgow a sound effects award.

And then give him one for spiritual effects, because “Stories by Heart” is delightful: illuminating the stories, uplifting us.

READ THE REVIEWS BUY TICKETS GROUP TICKETS
DOWNLOAD THE APP