BROADWAY REVIEWS

BROADWAY REVIEW: War Paint

April 6, 2017: Two of the most persuasive saleswomen New York has ever seen are peddling their wares with high style and equal determination at the Nederlander Theater, where “War Paint” opened on Thursday night. And no, I don’t mean the subjects of this data-heavy musical, the beauty-industry magnates Elizabeth Arden and Helena Rubinstein, though they were certainly no slouches in the art of the deal.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Amélie

April 3, 2017: For a cunning little bauble of an entertainment, the 2001 French film “Amélie” inspired uncommonly extreme responses. People were usually head over heels about it (“It’s so cute!”) or violently allergic to it (“But it’s so cute!”).

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BROADWAY REVIEW: The Play That Goes Wrong

April 2, 2017: When your world — or, as it often seems these days, the world — is falling apart, there’s perverse comfort in watching things go smash in a safe, contained environment. (And no, the White House doesn’t qualify.) Such is the brutal allure of monster truck jams, videos of toddlers falling off trikes and steel-cage wrestling matches.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Sweat (2017)

March 26, 2017: The bar that is the principal location for “Sweat,” Lynn Nottage’s bracingly topical portrait of American dreams deferred in working-class Pennsylvania, is a place where friendships go to die. Sure, it looks awfully cozy and welcoming, and you can see why its denizens regard it as a second home.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Miss Saigon

March 23, 2017: Even before the orchestra sighs its first purple notes from the swoony score of “Miss Saigon,” which opened in a time-warped revival on Thursday night, the audience at the Broadway Theater is treated to another noise — less mellifluous, perhaps, but more titillating, at least for the purposes of this show. Listen and thrill, O seekers of sensation, to the “pah-pah-pah” of rotor blades beating the air.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Arthur Miller’s The Price

March 16, 2017: Arthur Miller’s “The Price,” from 1968, is a tragedy disguised as a rummage sale. It plucks the slipcovers off the autobiographical material that Miller worked over for so much of his career — what sons owe to fathers, what brothers owe to each other, what the world owes to men of reasonable integrity. Women might owe things, too, but that was rarely Miller’s concern.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Come From Away

March 12, 2017: Try, if you must, to resist the gale of good will that blows out of “Come From Away,” the big bearhug of a musical that opened on Sunday night at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theater. But even the most stalwart cynics may have trouble staying dry-eyed during this portrait of heroic hospitality under extraordinary pressure.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: The Glass Menagerie (2017)

March 9, 2017: That shattering sound you hear coming from the Belasco Theater is the celebrated director Sam Gold taking a hammer to everything that’s delicate in “The Glass Menagerie.” The jagged, glistening shards of Tennessee Williams’s breakthrough play are available for inspection in the revival that opened on Thursday night.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Significant Other

March 2, 2017: The familiar and (you thought) anachronistic plaint, “Always a bridesmaid, never a bride,” assumes an extra degree of pain in Joshua Harmon’s Significant Other, the bubbly, teary comedy that opened on Thursday night at the Booth Theater. It’s bad enough that Jordan Berman’s closest buddies, all women, are getting married.

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BROADWAY REVIEW: Sunset Boulevard

February 9, 2017: The scenery may have shrunk, but that face — oh, that face — looms larger than ever. So does the ego that animates it, both indomitable and irreparably broken. “With one look,” indeed, to borrow a song lyric that describes such unsettling presence. That outrageous, over-the-top, desperate old lady shedding sanity on the stage of the Palace Theater still has the poetry in her gaze to break every heart. Yes, Hollywood’s most fatally narcissistic glamour girl, Norma Desmond, is back in town, in the pared-down revival of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Sunset Boulevard” that opened on Thursday night. It is a show that exists almost entirely to let its star blaze to her heart’s content. The light she casts is so dazzling, this seems an entirely sufficient reason to be.

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